Parents' reactions to participating in interviews about end-of-life decision making

Kelly Nicole Michelson, Tracy K. Koogler, Kathleen Romanowski, Christine Sullivan, Joel Frader

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although in-depth interviewing is well suited to studying the sensitive topic of end-of-life decision making, no reports have been published assessing the effects on parents of participating in interviews regarding end-of-life decision making for critically ill children. Objective: To examine the reactions of pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) patients' parents to interviews on end-of-life decision making for their child. Methods: We conducted semistructured interviews on end-of-life decision making with PICU patients' parents from two tertiary care PICUs. We approached 117 parents of 102 patients. Seventy-four parents (63%) of 69 patients participated. Results: Forty-three parents (61%) described the interview as "a good experience," 20 (29%) as "a neutral experience," and 1 (1%) as "a bad experience." The parent who judged the interview negatively stated that, "It bothers me a little bit because my son is [out] there having difficulties and I'm in here and not out there." Fifty-four of 59 parents (92%) said they would participate in another similar interview. Most parents (92%) felt the medical community should continue research on end-of-life decision making. Themes identified from the responses included: emotional reaction to the interviews; exposure to end-of-life decision-making issues; impact on parents' views; and impact on future end-of-life decision making. Parents' comments suggested that many perceived the interviews as beneficial. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the willingness of many parents of critically ill children to participate in study interviews regarding end-of-life decision making, a topic that most parents felt was important and warranted more research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1329-1338
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Palliative Medicine
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Decision Making
Parents
Interviews
Pediatric Intensive Care Units
Critical Illness
Tertiary Healthcare
Nuclear Family
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Parents' reactions to participating in interviews about end-of-life decision making. / Michelson, Kelly Nicole; Koogler, Tracy K.; Romanowski, Kathleen; Sullivan, Christine; Frader, Joel.

In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, Vol. 9, No. 6, 01.12.2006, p. 1329-1338.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Michelson, Kelly Nicole ; Koogler, Tracy K. ; Romanowski, Kathleen ; Sullivan, Christine ; Frader, Joel. / Parents' reactions to participating in interviews about end-of-life decision making. In: Journal of Palliative Medicine. 2006 ; Vol. 9, No. 6. pp. 1329-1338.
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