Parenting interventions for children with autism spectrum and disruptive behavior disorders

Opportunities for cross-fertilization

Lauren Brookman-Frazee, Aubyn Stahmer, Mary J. Baker-Ericzén, Katherine Tsai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Empirical support exists for parent training/education (PT/PE) interventions for children with disruptive behavior disorders (DBD) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). While the models share common roots, current approaches have largely developed independently and the research findings have been disseminated in two different literature traditions: mental health and developmental disabilities. Given that these populations often have overlapping clinical needs and are likely to receive services in similar settings, efforts to integrate the knowledge gained in the disparate literature may be beneficial. This article provides a systematic overview of the current (1995-2005) empirical research on PT/PE for children with DBD and ASD; attending to factors for cross-fertilization. Twenty-two ASD and 38 DBD studies were coded for review. Literature was compared in three main areas: (1) research methodology, (2) focus of PT/PE intervention, and (3) PT/PE procedures. There was no overlap in publication outlets between the studies for the two populations. Results indicate that there are opportunities for cross-fertilization in the areas of (1) research methodology, (2) intervention targets, and (3) format of parenting interventions. The practical implications of integrating these two highly related areas of research are identified and discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-200
Number of pages20
JournalClinical Child and Family Psychology Review
Volume9
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

Fingerprint

Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders
behavior disorder
Parenting
Autistic Disorder
autism
Fertilization
Research Design
Developmental Disabilities
Empirical Research
parents training
Research
Population
Publications
Mental Health
methodology
Education
empirical research
disability
mental health
Autism Spectrum Disorder

Keywords

  • Autism spectrum disorders
  • Disruptive behavior disorders
  • Parent education
  • Parent training
  • Treatment.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Parenting interventions for children with autism spectrum and disruptive behavior disorders : Opportunities for cross-fertilization. / Brookman-Frazee, Lauren; Stahmer, Aubyn; Baker-Ericzén, Mary J.; Tsai, Katherine.

In: Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, Vol. 9, No. 3-4, 01.12.2006, p. 181-200.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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