Parent–Child Care as a Brief Dyadic Intervention for Children With Mild to Moderate Externalizing Problems: A Case Study

Brandi N. Hawk, Susan Goff Timmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although many parenting interventions have been shown efficacious in reducing externalizing behavior problems in young children, they often take months to implement and tend to target children with moderate to severe behavior problems. Parent–Child Care (PC-CARE) was designed to be an engaging, brief (six-session) dyadic intervention to reduce mental health symptoms even for children with few behavior problems and/or parents who are unable to commit to lengthy treatments. We present an evidence-based case study of a 5-year-old child with mild externalizing problems and his biological parents, who participated in PC-CARE. Standardized measures were collected, and the child’s and parents’ emotional availability were assessed at pre- and posttreatment. Weekly codings of parent–child interactions and parent-reported measures of child behaviors were also collected. This child’s behavioral symptoms improved from pre- to posttreatment (per parents’ reports and observation), and he maintained this improved behavior 1 month after treatment. The parents similarly demonstrated improvement in their use of parenting skills and emotional availability. Aspects of treatment that may affect effectiveness are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical Case Studies
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 1 2018

Fingerprint

Parents
Parenting
Behavioral Symptoms
Child Behavior
Mental Health
Therapeutics
Observation
Problem Behavior

Keywords

  • behavioral intervention
  • behavioral management
  • behavioral therapy
  • pediatric/child

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Parent–Child Care as a Brief Dyadic Intervention for Children With Mild to Moderate Externalizing Problems : A Case Study. / Hawk, Brandi N.; Timmer, Susan Goff.

In: Clinical Case Studies, 01.05.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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