Parental occupational exposures to electromagnetic fields and radiation and the incidence of neuroblastoma in offspring

Anneclaire J. De Roos, Kay Teschke, David A. Savitz, Charles Poole, Seymour Grufferman, Bradley H Pollock, Andrew F. Olshan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined parental occupational exposures to electromagnetic fields and radiation and the incidence of neuroblastoma in offspring. Cases were 538 children diagnosed with neuroblastoma between 1992 and 1994 in the United States or Canada. Age-matched controls were selected by random-digit dialing. Occupational exposures to electrical equipment and radiation sources were classified by an industrial hygienist, and average exposures to extremely low frequency magnetic fields were estimated using a job exposure matrix. Maternal exposure to a broad grouping of sources that produce radiofrequency radiation was associated with an increased incidence of neuroblastoma (odds ratio = 2.8; 95% confidence interval = 0.9-8.7). Paternal exposure to battery-powered forklifts was positively associated with neuroblastoma (odds ratio = 1.6; 95% confidence interval = 0.8-3.2), as were some types of equipment that emit radiofrequency radiation (odds ratios ≅ 2.0); however, the broad groupings of sources that produce ELF fields, radiofrequency radiation, or ionizing radiation were not associated with neuroblastoma. Paternal average extremely low frequency magnetic field exposure >0.4 micro Tesla was weakly associated with neuroblastoma (odds ratio = 1.6; 95% confidence interval = 0.9-2.8), whereas maternal exposure was not. Overall, there was scant supportive evidence of strong associations between parental exposures in electromagnetic spectrum and neuroblastoma in offspring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)508-517
Number of pages10
JournalEpidemiology
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • Childhood cancer
  • Electromagnetic fields
  • Job exposure matrix
  • Neuroblastoma
  • Occupation
  • Parental exposures
  • Radiation
  • Radiofrequency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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