Parental factors correlated with developmental outcome in the migrant head start child

Mary Lou de Leon Siantz, M. Shelton Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined parental correlates of developmental outcomes among Mexican American migrant farmworker children. Sixty children, their parents, and their current teacher were interviewed. Parents were interviewed to assess psychological state (mastery, self-esteem, depression), family stress, social support, parenting behavior, and the children's developmental outcomes (behavioral problems, a general cognitive index, and peer acceptance). Teachers' reports were secured regarding child behavioral problems and peer acceptance. Regression analysis revealed that maternal parenting style accounted for a significant amount of the variance in child behavior problems reported by the mothers, while maternal social support helped to explain the variance in peer acceptance reported by the children. The more rejecting the maternal parenting style, the more child behavior problems were reported by the mother. Children of mothers who experienced social support reported more peer acceptance. Father parenting style and social support also helped to predict a significant amount of the variance in mother report of child behavior problems and teacher rating of child behavior problems. Unexpectedly, the more social support reported by the father, the more rejecting the parenting style, the more child behavior problems were reported by the mother, but fewer were the child behavior problems reported by the teacher.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)481-503
Number of pages23
JournalEarly Childhood Research Quarterly
Volume9
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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