Parent-child interaction therapy: Enhancing parent-child relationships

Anthony J. Urquiza, Susan Goff Timmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Disruptive child behavior problems are common problems for parents and can be associated with serious delinquent behaviors and aggressive/violent behaviors in adolescence and adulthood. Parenting interventions to address disruptive child behavior problems has gained widespread acceptance. One of these parenting interventions is Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT). PCIT is a 14- to 20-week, founded on social learning and attachment theories, designed for children between 2 and 7 years of age with disruptive, or externalizing, behavior problems. This article will provide a brief review of the history of PCIT, a description of the basic components of PCIT, and an overview of recent developments that highlight the promise of PCIT with maltreating parent-child relationships, traumatized children, and in developing resilience in young children. In addressing the three basic treatment objectives for PCIT (i.e., reduction in child behavior problems, improving parenting skills, enhancing the quality of parent-child relationships), there is an abundance of research demonstrating very strong treatment effects and therefore, its value to the field. Recent research has also demonstrated the value of PCIT in reducing trauma symptoms in young children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)145-156
Number of pages12
JournalPsychosocial Intervention
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

Keywords

  • behavior problems
  • Parent-Child Interaction Therapy
  • parenting skills
  • treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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