Parallel Processing in the Corticogeniculate Pathway of the Macaque Monkey

Farran Briggs, William Martin Usrey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although corticothalamic feedback is ubiquitous across species and modalities, its role in sensory processing is unclear. This study provides a detailed description of the visual physiology of corticogeniculate neurons in the primate. Using electrical stimulation to identify corticogeniculate neurons, we distinguish three groups of neurons with response properties that closely resemble those of neurons in the magnocellular, parvocellular, and koniocellular layers of their target structure, the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus. Our results indicate that corticogeniculate feedback in the primate is stream specific, and provide strong evidence in support of the view that corticothalamic feedback can influence the transmission of sensory information from the thalamus to the cortex in a stream-selective manner.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)135-146
Number of pages12
JournalNeuron
Volume62
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 16 2009

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Macaca
Haplorhini
Neurons
Primates
Ocular Physiological Phenomena
Geniculate Bodies
Lateral Thalamic Nuclei
Thalamus
Electric Stimulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Parallel Processing in the Corticogeniculate Pathway of the Macaque Monkey. / Briggs, Farran; Usrey, William Martin.

In: Neuron, Vol. 62, No. 1, 16.04.2009, p. 135-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Briggs, Farran ; Usrey, William Martin. / Parallel Processing in the Corticogeniculate Pathway of the Macaque Monkey. In: Neuron. 2009 ; Vol. 62, No. 1. pp. 135-146.
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