Paradigms of treatment in PsA

Laura C. Coates, April W. Armstrong

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a heterogeneous and multisystem disorder which requires careful collaborative management. In many cases both dermatologists and rheumatologists will be involved in the care of a patient and collaborative working between them can optimise management and patient satisfaction. Recent Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) treatment recommendations provide an evidence-based review of therapies in PsA across skin, nail and musculoskeletal domains of PsA as well as guidance for management of comorbidities. Despite increasing evidence for individual therapies in PsA, research into treatment strategies is still lacking. There is mounting evidence for a benefi t of early diagnosis within observational cohorts but no randomised trials of early intervention. Most physicians follow a “step-up” regime for PsA and this is supported by the EULAR treatment recommendations. Given the lack of evidence for early combination therapy and the potential toxicity of therapies it seems to be the best option at present. The Tight Control of PsA (TICOPA) study used a step up regime but compared tight control to an objective target (minimal disease activity) to standard care. This study has provided the fi rst evidence of the benefi t of treating to a pre-specifi ed target in PsA although further research into treatment strategies are warranted. There is also some early evidence that although treatment withdrawal in PsA often leads to a fl are of disease, dose reduction with biologic therapies may be possible in individuals responding well to therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPsoriatic Arthritis and Psoriasis: Pathology and Clinical Aspects
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages243-252
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9783319195308
ISBN (Print)9783319195292
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Psoriatic Arthritis
Therapeutics
Research
Biological Therapy
Nails
Secondary Prevention
Patient Satisfaction
Psoriasis
Comorbidity
Early Diagnosis
Patient Care
Physicians
Skin

Keywords

  • Collaborative working
  • Combined clinics
  • Early intervention
  • Minimal disease activity
  • Step up DMARD
  • Strategy
  • Tight control
  • Treat to target
  • Treatment
  • Treatment recommendations
  • Treatment reduction
  • Treatment withdrawal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Coates, L. C., & Armstrong, A. W. (2016). Paradigms of treatment in PsA. In Psoriatic Arthritis and Psoriasis: Pathology and Clinical Aspects (pp. 243-252). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-19530-8_25

Paradigms of treatment in PsA. / Coates, Laura C.; Armstrong, April W.

Psoriatic Arthritis and Psoriasis: Pathology and Clinical Aspects. Springer International Publishing, 2016. p. 243-252.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Coates, LC & Armstrong, AW 2016, Paradigms of treatment in PsA. in Psoriatic Arthritis and Psoriasis: Pathology and Clinical Aspects. Springer International Publishing, pp. 243-252. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-19530-8_25
Coates LC, Armstrong AW. Paradigms of treatment in PsA. In Psoriatic Arthritis and Psoriasis: Pathology and Clinical Aspects. Springer International Publishing. 2016. p. 243-252 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-19530-8_25
Coates, Laura C. ; Armstrong, April W. / Paradigms of treatment in PsA. Psoriatic Arthritis and Psoriasis: Pathology and Clinical Aspects. Springer International Publishing, 2016. pp. 243-252
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