Overactive Action Monitoring in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Evidence from Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Stefan Ursu, V. Andrew Stenger, M. Katherine Shear, Mark R. Jones, Cameron S Carter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

268 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been found to be hyperactive at rest, during symptom provocation, and after commission of errors in cognitive tasks. This hyperactivity might reflect an abnormality in conflict detection, a hypothesized basic mechanism for the action-monitoring function of the ACC. This hypothesis was tested using functional magnetic resonance imaging, by scanning 11 OCD patients and 13 matched control subjects while they performed a version of the continuous-performance task with four trial types that induced graded levels of response conflict. Although a behavioral index of conflict (i.e., accuracy) was similar for patients and control subjects, the ACC activation was increased in patients during high-conflict trials. The error-related activity in the same brain region was also higher in patients, consistent with previous electrophysiological findings. Both conflict- and error-related activity showed trends for positive correlations with severity of OCD symptoms, but not with anxiety. These findings suggest that as part of an overactive action-monitoring system, the ACC is more directly involved in the pathophysiology of OCD than previously thought.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-353
Number of pages7
JournalPsychological Science
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Gyrus Cinguli
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Task Performance and Analysis
Anxiety
Conflict (Psychology)
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Overactive Action Monitoring in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder : Evidence from Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. / Ursu, Stefan; Stenger, V. Andrew; Katherine Shear, M.; Jones, Mark R.; Carter, Cameron S.

In: Psychological Science, Vol. 14, No. 4, 07.2003, p. 347-353.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ursu, Stefan ; Stenger, V. Andrew ; Katherine Shear, M. ; Jones, Mark R. ; Carter, Cameron S. / Overactive Action Monitoring in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder : Evidence from Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In: Psychological Science. 2003 ; Vol. 14, No. 4. pp. 347-353.
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