Outcomes of Upper Arm Arteriovenous Fistulas for Maintenance Hemodialysis Access

Jason T. Fitzgerald, Andres Schanzer, Andrew I Chin, John McVicar, Richard V Perez, Christoph Troppmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Hypothesis: Radiocephalic fistulas for maintenance hemodialysis access are not feasible in all patients with end-stage renal disease. Our aim was to review our experience with 3 types of upper arm arteriovenous fistula (AVF) to ascertain whether they are reasonable alternatives to radiocephalic fistulas and which, if any, have superior performance. Patients and Methods: Patient medical records were retrospectively reviewed. The main outcomes were maturation rate, time to maturation, assisted maturation rate, complication rates, reintervention rates, primary and assisted primary patency rates, and effects of comorbidities. Results: Eighty-six patients with end-stage renal disease underwent creation of a brachiocephalic, brachiobasilic, or brachial artery-to-median antecubital vein AVF. Overall, 80% matured, with 23% requiring an intervention to achieve maturity. The mean time to maturation was 3.8 months; 47% had a complication (inability to access, thrombosis, and so on), and 43% required additional interventions. The overall primary patency and assisted primary patency rates at 12 months were 50% and 74%, respectively. Brachiobasilic AVFs not superficialized immediately often needed a second operation. There were no significant differences in patency rates among the 3 AVF types. The AVFs in patients with diabetes took 2 months longer to mature than did those in patients without diabetes. Conclusions: An upper arm AVF is a reasonable alternative for maintenance hemodialysis access when a radiocephalic AVF is not possible. There are 3 valid options from which to choose to best accommodate each patient's antecubital anatomy. Diabetes may adversely affect outcomes. Our data suggest that brachiobasilic AVFs should be superficialized at the initial procedure, if feasible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)201-208
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Surgery
Volume139
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2004

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Arteriovenous Fistula
Renal Dialysis
Arm
Maintenance
Chronic Kidney Failure
Fistula
Brachial Artery
Medical Records
Comorbidity
Veins
Anatomy
Thrombosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Outcomes of Upper Arm Arteriovenous Fistulas for Maintenance Hemodialysis Access. / Fitzgerald, Jason T.; Schanzer, Andres; Chin, Andrew I; McVicar, John; Perez, Richard V; Troppmann, Christoph.

In: Archives of Surgery, Vol. 139, No. 2, 02.2004, p. 201-208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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