OUTCOMES OF SNARE-RELATED INJURIES TO ENDANGERED MOUNTAIN GORILLAS ( GORILLA BERINGEI BERINGEI) IN RWANDA

Marlene K. Haggblade, Woutrina A Smith, Jean Bosco Noheri, Clementine Usanase, Antoine Mudakikwa, Michael R. Cranfield, Kirsten V Gilardi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mountain gorillas ( Gorilla beringei beringei) are one of the most critically endangered great apes in the world. The most common cause of mountain gorilla morbidity and mortality is trauma (e.g., injury from conspecifics or snare entrapment). We conducted a retrospective case-control study of free-ranging, human-habituated mountain gorillas to evaluate factors associated with snare entrapment and the results of clinical intervention. Data were collected from clinical records on all clinical intervention cases ( n=132) in Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda, conducted between 1995-2015. Wildlife veterinarians treated 37 gorillas entrapped in snares and 95 gorillas for other clinical conditions (including trauma and respiratory illness). Multivariate statistical analyses revealed that young gorillas (<8 yr old) were more likely than older gorillas to become snared; that comorbidities delayed times to intervention (≥3 d); and that severity of wounds at the time of intervention were associated with increased risk of lasting impairment (including loss of limb or limb function, or death) within 1 mo after intervention. Our results may influence decisions for gorilla health monitoring and treatment to most effectively conserve this critically endangered species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)298-303
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of wildlife diseases
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

Fingerprint

Gorilla beringei
Rwanda
Gorilla gorilla
Gorilla
mountains
mountain
limb
health monitoring
morbidity
endangered species
limbs (animal)
national park
volcano
mortality
volcanoes
Pongidae
case-control studies
animal injuries
veterinarians
wildlife

Keywords

  • Conservation medicine
  • mountain gorilla
  • Rwanda
  • snares

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology

Cite this

OUTCOMES OF SNARE-RELATED INJURIES TO ENDANGERED MOUNTAIN GORILLAS ( GORILLA BERINGEI BERINGEI) IN RWANDA. / Haggblade, Marlene K.; Smith, Woutrina A; Noheri, Jean Bosco; Usanase, Clementine; Mudakikwa, Antoine; Cranfield, Michael R.; Gilardi, Kirsten V.

In: Journal of wildlife diseases, Vol. 55, No. 2, 01.04.2019, p. 298-303.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Haggblade, Marlene K. ; Smith, Woutrina A ; Noheri, Jean Bosco ; Usanase, Clementine ; Mudakikwa, Antoine ; Cranfield, Michael R. ; Gilardi, Kirsten V. / OUTCOMES OF SNARE-RELATED INJURIES TO ENDANGERED MOUNTAIN GORILLAS ( GORILLA BERINGEI BERINGEI) IN RWANDA. In: Journal of wildlife diseases. 2019 ; Vol. 55, No. 2. pp. 298-303.
@article{faf27c6ced5a40e794259c50c0a587b8,
title = "OUTCOMES OF SNARE-RELATED INJURIES TO ENDANGERED MOUNTAIN GORILLAS ( GORILLA BERINGEI BERINGEI) IN RWANDA",
abstract = "Mountain gorillas ( Gorilla beringei beringei) are one of the most critically endangered great apes in the world. The most common cause of mountain gorilla morbidity and mortality is trauma (e.g., injury from conspecifics or snare entrapment). We conducted a retrospective case-control study of free-ranging, human-habituated mountain gorillas to evaluate factors associated with snare entrapment and the results of clinical intervention. Data were collected from clinical records on all clinical intervention cases ( n=132) in Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda, conducted between 1995-2015. Wildlife veterinarians treated 37 gorillas entrapped in snares and 95 gorillas for other clinical conditions (including trauma and respiratory illness). Multivariate statistical analyses revealed that young gorillas (<8 yr old) were more likely than older gorillas to become snared; that comorbidities delayed times to intervention (≥3 d); and that severity of wounds at the time of intervention were associated with increased risk of lasting impairment (including loss of limb or limb function, or death) within 1 mo after intervention. Our results may influence decisions for gorilla health monitoring and treatment to most effectively conserve this critically endangered species.",
keywords = "Conservation medicine, mountain gorilla, Rwanda, snares",
author = "Haggblade, {Marlene K.} and Smith, {Woutrina A} and Noheri, {Jean Bosco} and Clementine Usanase and Antoine Mudakikwa and Cranfield, {Michael R.} and Gilardi, {Kirsten V}",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.7589/2018-01-008",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "55",
pages = "298--303",
journal = "Journal of Wildlife Diseases",
issn = "0090-3558",
publisher = "Wildlife Disease Association, Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - OUTCOMES OF SNARE-RELATED INJURIES TO ENDANGERED MOUNTAIN GORILLAS ( GORILLA BERINGEI BERINGEI) IN RWANDA

AU - Haggblade, Marlene K.

AU - Smith, Woutrina A

AU - Noheri, Jean Bosco

AU - Usanase, Clementine

AU - Mudakikwa, Antoine

AU - Cranfield, Michael R.

AU - Gilardi, Kirsten V

PY - 2019/4/1

Y1 - 2019/4/1

N2 - Mountain gorillas ( Gorilla beringei beringei) are one of the most critically endangered great apes in the world. The most common cause of mountain gorilla morbidity and mortality is trauma (e.g., injury from conspecifics or snare entrapment). We conducted a retrospective case-control study of free-ranging, human-habituated mountain gorillas to evaluate factors associated with snare entrapment and the results of clinical intervention. Data were collected from clinical records on all clinical intervention cases ( n=132) in Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda, conducted between 1995-2015. Wildlife veterinarians treated 37 gorillas entrapped in snares and 95 gorillas for other clinical conditions (including trauma and respiratory illness). Multivariate statistical analyses revealed that young gorillas (<8 yr old) were more likely than older gorillas to become snared; that comorbidities delayed times to intervention (≥3 d); and that severity of wounds at the time of intervention were associated with increased risk of lasting impairment (including loss of limb or limb function, or death) within 1 mo after intervention. Our results may influence decisions for gorilla health monitoring and treatment to most effectively conserve this critically endangered species.

AB - Mountain gorillas ( Gorilla beringei beringei) are one of the most critically endangered great apes in the world. The most common cause of mountain gorilla morbidity and mortality is trauma (e.g., injury from conspecifics or snare entrapment). We conducted a retrospective case-control study of free-ranging, human-habituated mountain gorillas to evaluate factors associated with snare entrapment and the results of clinical intervention. Data were collected from clinical records on all clinical intervention cases ( n=132) in Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda, conducted between 1995-2015. Wildlife veterinarians treated 37 gorillas entrapped in snares and 95 gorillas for other clinical conditions (including trauma and respiratory illness). Multivariate statistical analyses revealed that young gorillas (<8 yr old) were more likely than older gorillas to become snared; that comorbidities delayed times to intervention (≥3 d); and that severity of wounds at the time of intervention were associated with increased risk of lasting impairment (including loss of limb or limb function, or death) within 1 mo after intervention. Our results may influence decisions for gorilla health monitoring and treatment to most effectively conserve this critically endangered species.

KW - Conservation medicine

KW - mountain gorilla

KW - Rwanda

KW - snares

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85064722283&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85064722283&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.7589/2018-01-008

DO - 10.7589/2018-01-008

M3 - Article

C2 - 30284944

AN - SCOPUS:85064722283

VL - 55

SP - 298

EP - 303

JO - Journal of Wildlife Diseases

JF - Journal of Wildlife Diseases

SN - 0090-3558

IS - 2

ER -