Outcomes and resource utilization associated with underage drinking at a level i trauma center

Kevin J. Psoter, Bahman Sayyar Roudsari, Christopher Mack, Monica S. Vavilala, Jeffrey G. Jarvik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose To examine the association of blood alcohol content (BAC) on hospital-based outcomes and imaging utilization for patients <21 years admitted to a level I trauma center. Methods Retrospective analysis of alcohol-involved injuries in patients 13-20 years, admitted to a level I trauma center from 1996 to 2010. An injury was considered alcohol involved if the patient had a BAC > 0. Multivariable logistic regression was used to compare mortality, discharge destination (home and skilled nursing facility), intensive care unit admission, and operating room use between patients with and without positive BAC for patients 13-15, 16-17, and 18-20 years. Multivariable linear regression was used to compare length of hospitalization. Finally, multivariable negative binomial regression evaluated radiology resource utilization (x-ray, computed tomography [CT], and magnetic resonance imaging). Results A total of 7,663 patients, 13-20 years old, were admitted over the study period. A positive BAC was reported in 19% of these patients. In general, the presence of alcohol was not associated with mortality rate, length of hospitalization, intensive care unit, and operating room use or discharge status for any age group. However, the presence of alcohol was associated with higher utilization of head (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1.13, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.26), cervical spine (IRR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01-1.22), and thoracic (IRR 1.30, 95% CI 1.05-1.63) CTs in young adults 18-20 years. No differences in CT use were observed in patients 13-15 or 16-17 years. Conclusions Positive BAC was not significantly associated with adverse outcomes or resource utilization in younger trauma patients. However, the use of certain body region CTs was associated with positive BAC in patients 18-20 years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)195-200
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Trauma Centers
Confidence Intervals
Operating Rooms
Intensive Care Units
Incidence
Hospitalization
Tomography
Alcohols
Skilled Nursing Facilities
Home Nursing
Body Regions
Mortality
Underage Drinking
Radiology
Young Adult
Linear Models
Spine
Thorax
Age Groups
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Computed tomography
  • Injuries
  • Outcomes
  • Pediatric
  • Resource utilization
  • Trauma
  • Underage drinking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Outcomes and resource utilization associated with underage drinking at a level i trauma center. / Psoter, Kevin J.; Sayyar Roudsari, Bahman; Mack, Christopher; Vavilala, Monica S.; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 55, No. 2, 01.01.2014, p. 195-200.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Psoter, Kevin J. ; Sayyar Roudsari, Bahman ; Mack, Christopher ; Vavilala, Monica S. ; Jarvik, Jeffrey G. / Outcomes and resource utilization associated with underage drinking at a level i trauma center. In: Journal of Adolescent Health. 2014 ; Vol. 55, No. 2. pp. 195-200.
@article{dae6f9bff34b4c5490053010b975ef33,
title = "Outcomes and resource utilization associated with underage drinking at a level i trauma center",
abstract = "Purpose To examine the association of blood alcohol content (BAC) on hospital-based outcomes and imaging utilization for patients <21 years admitted to a level I trauma center. Methods Retrospective analysis of alcohol-involved injuries in patients 13-20 years, admitted to a level I trauma center from 1996 to 2010. An injury was considered alcohol involved if the patient had a BAC > 0. Multivariable logistic regression was used to compare mortality, discharge destination (home and skilled nursing facility), intensive care unit admission, and operating room use between patients with and without positive BAC for patients 13-15, 16-17, and 18-20 years. Multivariable linear regression was used to compare length of hospitalization. Finally, multivariable negative binomial regression evaluated radiology resource utilization (x-ray, computed tomography [CT], and magnetic resonance imaging). Results A total of 7,663 patients, 13-20 years old, were admitted over the study period. A positive BAC was reported in 19{\%} of these patients. In general, the presence of alcohol was not associated with mortality rate, length of hospitalization, intensive care unit, and operating room use or discharge status for any age group. However, the presence of alcohol was associated with higher utilization of head (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1.13, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.26), cervical spine (IRR 1.10, 95{\%} CI 1.01-1.22), and thoracic (IRR 1.30, 95{\%} CI 1.05-1.63) CTs in young adults 18-20 years. No differences in CT use were observed in patients 13-15 or 16-17 years. Conclusions Positive BAC was not significantly associated with adverse outcomes or resource utilization in younger trauma patients. However, the use of certain body region CTs was associated with positive BAC in patients 18-20 years.",
keywords = "Adolescent, Computed tomography, Injuries, Outcomes, Pediatric, Resource utilization, Trauma, Underage drinking",
author = "Psoter, {Kevin J.} and {Sayyar Roudsari}, Bahman and Christopher Mack and Vavilala, {Monica S.} and Jarvik, {Jeffrey G.}",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jadohealth.2014.01.018",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "55",
pages = "195--200",
journal = "Journal of Adolescent Health",
issn = "1054-139X",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Outcomes and resource utilization associated with underage drinking at a level i trauma center

AU - Psoter, Kevin J.

AU - Sayyar Roudsari, Bahman

AU - Mack, Christopher

AU - Vavilala, Monica S.

AU - Jarvik, Jeffrey G.

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Purpose To examine the association of blood alcohol content (BAC) on hospital-based outcomes and imaging utilization for patients <21 years admitted to a level I trauma center. Methods Retrospective analysis of alcohol-involved injuries in patients 13-20 years, admitted to a level I trauma center from 1996 to 2010. An injury was considered alcohol involved if the patient had a BAC > 0. Multivariable logistic regression was used to compare mortality, discharge destination (home and skilled nursing facility), intensive care unit admission, and operating room use between patients with and without positive BAC for patients 13-15, 16-17, and 18-20 years. Multivariable linear regression was used to compare length of hospitalization. Finally, multivariable negative binomial regression evaluated radiology resource utilization (x-ray, computed tomography [CT], and magnetic resonance imaging). Results A total of 7,663 patients, 13-20 years old, were admitted over the study period. A positive BAC was reported in 19% of these patients. In general, the presence of alcohol was not associated with mortality rate, length of hospitalization, intensive care unit, and operating room use or discharge status for any age group. However, the presence of alcohol was associated with higher utilization of head (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1.13, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.26), cervical spine (IRR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01-1.22), and thoracic (IRR 1.30, 95% CI 1.05-1.63) CTs in young adults 18-20 years. No differences in CT use were observed in patients 13-15 or 16-17 years. Conclusions Positive BAC was not significantly associated with adverse outcomes or resource utilization in younger trauma patients. However, the use of certain body region CTs was associated with positive BAC in patients 18-20 years.

AB - Purpose To examine the association of blood alcohol content (BAC) on hospital-based outcomes and imaging utilization for patients <21 years admitted to a level I trauma center. Methods Retrospective analysis of alcohol-involved injuries in patients 13-20 years, admitted to a level I trauma center from 1996 to 2010. An injury was considered alcohol involved if the patient had a BAC > 0. Multivariable logistic regression was used to compare mortality, discharge destination (home and skilled nursing facility), intensive care unit admission, and operating room use between patients with and without positive BAC for patients 13-15, 16-17, and 18-20 years. Multivariable linear regression was used to compare length of hospitalization. Finally, multivariable negative binomial regression evaluated radiology resource utilization (x-ray, computed tomography [CT], and magnetic resonance imaging). Results A total of 7,663 patients, 13-20 years old, were admitted over the study period. A positive BAC was reported in 19% of these patients. In general, the presence of alcohol was not associated with mortality rate, length of hospitalization, intensive care unit, and operating room use or discharge status for any age group. However, the presence of alcohol was associated with higher utilization of head (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1.13, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.26), cervical spine (IRR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01-1.22), and thoracic (IRR 1.30, 95% CI 1.05-1.63) CTs in young adults 18-20 years. No differences in CT use were observed in patients 13-15 or 16-17 years. Conclusions Positive BAC was not significantly associated with adverse outcomes or resource utilization in younger trauma patients. However, the use of certain body region CTs was associated with positive BAC in patients 18-20 years.

KW - Adolescent

KW - Computed tomography

KW - Injuries

KW - Outcomes

KW - Pediatric

KW - Resource utilization

KW - Trauma

KW - Underage drinking

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84904998365&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84904998365&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2014.01.018

DO - 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2014.01.018

M3 - Article

VL - 55

SP - 195

EP - 200

JO - Journal of Adolescent Health

JF - Journal of Adolescent Health

SN - 1054-139X

IS - 2

ER -