Outcomes and follow-up strategies for patients on active surveillance

Marc Dall'Era, Peter R. Carroll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Prostate cancer is now the most commonly diagnosed solid tumor in American men. Autopsy studies show the uniquely high prevalence rates of small, indolent tumors in men dying of other causes. These findings have led to an increased interest in managing men with prostate cancer and low risk features expectantly, with close observation for early signs of progression. This approach allows one to limit prostate cancer treatment and any risk of related morbidity to the men who will benefit the most from active intervention. RECENT FINDINGS: Several centers have published their results with active surveillance and delayed selective therapy for men with low grade, early prostate cancer. Although median follow up from these studies is relatively short, the outcomes appear favorable. About one third of men will receive treatment after 3-5 years of surveillance and quality of life remains high. SUMMARY: Data from these reports provide patients and clinicians with the early experiences and expectations with active surveillance for prostate cancer. They also provide a framework for selecting men for this approach and for following them over time. Prospective, randomized trials comparing active surveillance with standard interventions are underway.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)258-262
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Opinion in Urology
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2009

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Prostatic Neoplasms
Autopsy
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Quality of Life
Observation
Morbidity

Keywords

  • Active surveillance
  • Outcomes
  • Prostate cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Outcomes and follow-up strategies for patients on active surveillance. / Dall'Era, Marc; Carroll, Peter R.

In: Current Opinion in Urology, Vol. 19, No. 3, 05.2009, p. 258-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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