Outcome measures from experimental traumatic brain injury in male rats vary with the complete temporal biomechanical profile of the injury event

Radia Abdul-Wahab, Mathew T. Long, Rafael Ordaz, Bruce G. Lyeth, Bryan J. Pfister

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Millions suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI) each year wherein the outcomes associated with injury can vary greatly between individuals. This study postulates that variations in each biomechanical parameter of a head trauma lead to differences in histological and behavioral outcome measures that should be considered collectively in assessing injury. While trauma severity typically scales with the magnitude of injury, much less is known about the effects of rate and duration of the mechanical insult. In this study, a newly developed voice-coil fluid percussion injury system was used to investigate the effects of injury rate and fluid percussion impulse on a collection of post-injury outcomes in male rats. Collectively the data suggest a potential shift in the specificity and progression of neuronal injury and function rather than a general scaling of injury severity. While a faster, shorter fluid percussion first presents as a mild TBI, neuronal loss and some behavioral tasks were similar among the slower and faster fluid percussion injuries. This study concludes that the sequelae of neuronal degeneration and behavioral outcomes are related to the complete temporal profile of the fluid percussion and do not scale only with peak pressure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2027-2044
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Research
Volume98
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2020

Keywords

  • fluid percussion
  • impulse
  • injury biomechanics
  • injury rate
  • injury severity
  • mild TBI
  • RRID:SCR_002865
  • RRID:SCR_003137
  • RRID:SCR_013726

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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