Osteoradionecrosis of the skull

Richard E Latchaw, T. O. Gabrielsen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Osteoradionecrosis of the skull appears to be an increasingly rare complication following irradiation for intracranial neoplasms, probably in part due to the use of high energy techniques rather than orthovoltage during recent years. An awareness of the usual asymptomatic nature and possible late discovery of these lesions aids in the correct roentgenographic diagnosis. Among several differential diagnoses which are discussed, osteomyelitis and metastatic neoplasms are generally the most important considerations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationUniversity of Michigan Medical Center Journal
Pages166-169
Number of pages4
Volume39
Edition4
StatePublished - 1973
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Osteoradionecrosis
Osteomyelitis
Skull
Brain Neoplasms
Differential Diagnosis
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Latchaw, R. E., & Gabrielsen, T. O. (1973). Osteoradionecrosis of the skull. In University of Michigan Medical Center Journal (4 ed., Vol. 39, pp. 166-169)

Osteoradionecrosis of the skull. / Latchaw, Richard E; Gabrielsen, T. O.

University of Michigan Medical Center Journal. Vol. 39 4. ed. 1973. p. 166-169.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Latchaw, RE & Gabrielsen, TO 1973, Osteoradionecrosis of the skull. in University of Michigan Medical Center Journal. 4 edn, vol. 39, pp. 166-169.
Latchaw RE, Gabrielsen TO. Osteoradionecrosis of the skull. In University of Michigan Medical Center Journal. 4 ed. Vol. 39. 1973. p. 166-169
Latchaw, Richard E ; Gabrielsen, T. O. / Osteoradionecrosis of the skull. University of Michigan Medical Center Journal. Vol. 39 4. ed. 1973. pp. 166-169
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