One-year follow-up evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism

Elizabeth Herst Bertoy, Edward C Feldman, Richard W Nelson, Arthur B. Dublin, Michael H Reid, Marsha S. Feldman

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Abstract

Objective - To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scans of dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH) and no signs of CNS dysfunction 1 year after diagnosis and initial MRI. Design - Prospective study of surviving dogs from a previous study. Animals - 13 dogs underwent MRI of the brain at the time that PDH was diagnosed and prior to treatment. At that time, none of the dogs had clinical signs suggestive of an intracranial mass. Approximately 1 year after diagnosis and MRI, the brain was again evaluated by MRI. Results - On the initial MRI scan, 5 of the 13 dogs had normal findings, and 8 had evidence of a mass (tumor) in the area of the pituitary gland. Of the 5 dogs that had no visible pituitary mass on the initial MRI scan, 3 had a normal MRI brain scan 1 year later. Of the 5 dogs that had no visible pituitary mass on initial MRI scan, 2 had a visible pituitary mass at 1 year. The 8 dogs that had a visible mass on the initial MRI brain scan had easily identified pituitary masses on the second MRI scan. Of these 8 dogs, 4 had no apparent change in pituitary mass size, and 4 had obvious increase in vertical height of the pituitary mass. Of the 4 dogs, 2 developed signs of neurologic dysfunction within 1 year after diagnosis of PDH, presumably attributable to that mass. Of the 13 dogs, 12 were treated with mitotane soon after completion of the initial MRI scan. Sensitivity to mitotane and initial pituitary mass size or growth were not correlated. Of the 13 dogs evaluated initially and 1 year after diagnosis, 10 had pituitary masses identified on MRI brain scans. Clinical Implications - The incidence of visible pituitary masses among dogs with PDH at the time of or within a year of diagnosis was > 75%. In 2 dogs, signs of CNS dysfunction developed within 1 year of PDH diagnosis when pituitary masses were ≥ 10 mm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1268-1273
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume208
Issue number8
StatePublished - Apr 15 1996

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Adrenocortical Hyperfunction
hyperadrenocorticism
magnetic resonance imaging
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Dogs
brain
dogs
Brain
mitotane
Mitotane
pituitary gland
Pituitary Gland
Neurologic Manifestations
prospective studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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One-year follow-up evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism. / Bertoy, Elizabeth Herst; Feldman, Edward C; Nelson, Richard W; Dublin, Arthur B.; Reid, Michael H; Feldman, Marsha S.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 208, No. 8, 15.04.1996, p. 1268-1273.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective - To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scans of dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH) and no signs of CNS dysfunction 1 year after diagnosis and initial MRI. Design - Prospective study of surviving dogs from a previous study. Animals - 13 dogs underwent MRI of the brain at the time that PDH was diagnosed and prior to treatment. At that time, none of the dogs had clinical signs suggestive of an intracranial mass. Approximately 1 year after diagnosis and MRI, the brain was again evaluated by MRI. Results - On the initial MRI scan, 5 of the 13 dogs had normal findings, and 8 had evidence of a mass (tumor) in the area of the pituitary gland. Of the 5 dogs that had no visible pituitary mass on the initial MRI scan, 3 had a normal MRI brain scan 1 year later. Of the 5 dogs that had no visible pituitary mass on initial MRI scan, 2 had a visible pituitary mass at 1 year. The 8 dogs that had a visible mass on the initial MRI brain scan had easily identified pituitary masses on the second MRI scan. Of these 8 dogs, 4 had no apparent change in pituitary mass size, and 4 had obvious increase in vertical height of the pituitary mass. Of the 4 dogs, 2 developed signs of neurologic dysfunction within 1 year after diagnosis of PDH, presumably attributable to that mass. Of the 13 dogs, 12 were treated with mitotane soon after completion of the initial MRI scan. Sensitivity to mitotane and initial pituitary mass size or growth were not correlated. Of the 13 dogs evaluated initially and 1 year after diagnosis, 10 had pituitary masses identified on MRI brain scans. Clinical Implications - The incidence of visible pituitary masses among dogs with PDH at the time of or within a year of diagnosis was > 75{\%}. In 2 dogs, signs of CNS dysfunction developed within 1 year of PDH diagnosis when pituitary masses were ≥ 10 mm.",
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