One Health proof of concept: Bringing a transdisciplinary approach to surveillance for zoonotic viruses at the human-wild animal interface

PREDICT Consortium

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As the world continues to react and respond inefficiently to emerging infectious diseases, such as Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome and the Ebola and Zika viruses, a growing transdisciplinary community has called for a more proactive and holistic approach to prevention and preparedness – One Health. Such an approach presents important opportunities to reduce the impact of disease emergence events and also to mitigate future emergence through improved cross-sectoral coordination. In an attempt to provide proof of concept of the utility of the One Health approach, the US Agency for International Development's PREDICT project consortium designed and implemented a targeted, risk-based surveillance strategy based not on humans as sentinels of disease but on detecting viruses early, at their source, where intervention strategies can be implemented before there is opportunity for spillover and spread in people or food animals. Here, we share One Health approaches used by consortium members to illustrate the potential for successful One Health outcomes that can be achieved through collaborative, transdisciplinary partnerships. PREDICT's collaboration with partners around the world on strengthening local capacity to detect hundreds of viruses in wild animals, coupled with a series of cutting-edge virological and analytical activities, have significantly improved our baseline knowledge on the zoonotic pool of viruses and the risk of exposure to people. Further testament to the success of the project's One Health approach and the work of its team of dedicated One Health professionals are the resulting 90 peer-reviewed, scientific publications in under 5 years that improve our understanding of zoonoses and the factors influencing their emergence. The findings are assisting in global health improvements, including surveillance science, diagnostic technologies, understanding of viral evolution, and ecological driver identification. Through its One Health leadership and multi-disciplinary partnerships, PREDICT has forged new networks of professionals from the human, animal, and environmental health sectors to promote global health, improving our understanding of viral disease spillover from wildlife and implementing strategies for preventing and controlling emerging disease threats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)112-118
Number of pages7
JournalPreventive Veterinary Medicine
Volume137
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

Fingerprint

Wild Animals
Zoonoses
wild animals
emerging diseases
Zika virus
Viruses
viruses
monitoring
Ebolavirus
development projects
leadership
food animals
peers
health care workers
zoonoses
animal health
human health
wildlife
United States Agency for International Development
Emerging Communicable Diseases

Keywords

  • Emerging infectious disease
  • Human-wildlife interface
  • One Health
  • Surveillance
  • Wildlife
  • Zoonotic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Animals
  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

One Health proof of concept : Bringing a transdisciplinary approach to surveillance for zoonotic viruses at the human-wild animal interface. / PREDICT Consortium.

In: Preventive Veterinary Medicine, Vol. 137, 01.02.2017, p. 112-118.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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