On the Roles of Stereotype Activation and Application in Diminishing Implicit Bias

Andrew M. Rivers, Jeffrey Sherman, Heather R. Rees, Regina Reichardt, Karl C. Klauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Stereotypes can influence social perception in undesirable ways. However, activated stereotypes are not always applied in judgments. The present research investigated how stereotype activation and application processes impact social judgments as a function of available resources for control over stereotypes. Specifically, we varied the time available to intervene in the stereotyping process and used multinomial modeling to independently estimate stereotype activation and application. As expected, social judgments were less stereotypic when participants had more time to intervene. In terms of mechanisms, stereotype application, and not stereotype activation, corresponded with reductions in stereotypic biases. With increasing time, stereotype application was reduced, reflecting the fact that controlling application is time-dependent. In contrast, stereotype activation increased with increasing time, apparently due to increased engagement with stereotypic material. Stereotype activation was highest when judgments were least stereotypical, and thus, reduced stereotyping may coincide with increased stereotype activation if stereotype application is simultaneously decreased.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Stereotyping
Social Perception
Research

Keywords

  • implicit cognition
  • multinomial modeling
  • prejudice/stereotyping
  • self-regulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Cite this

On the Roles of Stereotype Activation and Application in Diminishing Implicit Bias. / Rivers, Andrew M.; Sherman, Jeffrey; Rees, Heather R.; Reichardt, Regina; Klauer, Karl C.

In: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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