Olig2/Plp-positive progenitor cells give rise to bergmann glia in the cerebellum

S. H. Chung, Fuzheng Guo, P. Jiang, David E Pleasure, Wenbin Deng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

NG2 (nerve/glial antigen2)-expressing cells represent the largest population of postnatal progenitors in the central nervous system and have been classified as oligodendroglial progenitor cells, but the fate and function of these cells remain incompletely characterized. Previous studies have focused on characterizing these progenitors in the postnatal and adult subventricular zone and on analyzing the cellular and physiological properties of these cells in white and gray matter regions in the forebrain. In the present study, we examine the types of neural progeny generated by NG2 progenitors in the cerebellum by employing genetic fate mapping techniques using inducible Cre-Lox systems in vivo with two different mouse lines, the Plp-Cre-ERT2/Rosa26-EYFP and Olig2-Cre-ERT2/Rosa26-EYFP double-transgenic mice. Our data indicate that Olig2/Plp-positive NG2 cells display multipotential properties, primarily give rise to oligodendroglia but, surprisingly, also generate Bergmann glia, which are specialized glial cells in the cerebellum. The NG2+ cells also give rise to astrocytes, but not neurons. In addition, we show that glutamate signaling is involved in distinct NG2+ cell-fate/differentiation pathways and plays a role in the normal development of Bergmann glia. We also show an increase of cerebellar oligodendroglial lineage cells in response to hypoxic-ischemic injury, but the ability of NG2+ cells to give rise to Bergmann glia and astrocytes remains unchanged. Overall, our study reveals a novel Bergmann glia fate of Olig2/Plp-positive NG2 progenitors, demonstrates the differentiation of these progenitors into various functional glial cell types, and provides significant insights into the fate and function of Olig2/Plp-positive progenitor cells in health and disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCell Death and Disease
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

Fingerprint

Neuroglia
Cerebellum
Stem Cells
Astrocytes
Lateral Ventricles
Oligodendroglia
Prosencephalon
Transgenic Mice
Cell Differentiation
Glutamic Acid
Central Nervous System
Neurons

Keywords

  • Bergmann glia
  • Cerebellum
  • Olig2 progenitor cell

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Immunology
  • Cancer Research
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Olig2/Plp-positive progenitor cells give rise to bergmann glia in the cerebellum. / Chung, S. H.; Guo, Fuzheng; Jiang, P.; Pleasure, David E; Deng, Wenbin.

In: Cell Death and Disease, Vol. 4, No. 3, 03.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - NG2 (nerve/glial antigen2)-expressing cells represent the largest population of postnatal progenitors in the central nervous system and have been classified as oligodendroglial progenitor cells, but the fate and function of these cells remain incompletely characterized. Previous studies have focused on characterizing these progenitors in the postnatal and adult subventricular zone and on analyzing the cellular and physiological properties of these cells in white and gray matter regions in the forebrain. In the present study, we examine the types of neural progeny generated by NG2 progenitors in the cerebellum by employing genetic fate mapping techniques using inducible Cre-Lox systems in vivo with two different mouse lines, the Plp-Cre-ERT2/Rosa26-EYFP and Olig2-Cre-ERT2/Rosa26-EYFP double-transgenic mice. Our data indicate that Olig2/Plp-positive NG2 cells display multipotential properties, primarily give rise to oligodendroglia but, surprisingly, also generate Bergmann glia, which are specialized glial cells in the cerebellum. The NG2+ cells also give rise to astrocytes, but not neurons. In addition, we show that glutamate signaling is involved in distinct NG2+ cell-fate/differentiation pathways and plays a role in the normal development of Bergmann glia. We also show an increase of cerebellar oligodendroglial lineage cells in response to hypoxic-ischemic injury, but the ability of NG2+ cells to give rise to Bergmann glia and astrocytes remains unchanged. Overall, our study reveals a novel Bergmann glia fate of Olig2/Plp-positive NG2 progenitors, demonstrates the differentiation of these progenitors into various functional glial cell types, and provides significant insights into the fate and function of Olig2/Plp-positive progenitor cells in health and disease.

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