Off-label biologic regimens in psoriasis

A systematic review of efficacy and safety of dose escalation, reduction, and interrupted biologic therapy

Elizabeth A. Brezinski, April W. Armstrong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: While off-label dosing of biologic treatments may be necessary in selected psoriasis patients, no systematic review exists to date that synthesizes the efficacy and safety of these off-label dosing regimens. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate efficacy and safety of off-label dosing regimens (dose escalation, dose reduction, and interrupted treatment) with etanercept, adalimumab, infliximab, ustekinumab, and alefacept for psoriasis treatment. Data Sources and Study Selection: We searched OVID Medline from January 1, 1990 through August 1, 2011 for prospective clinical trials that studied biologic therapy for psoriasis treatment in adults. Individual articles were screened for studies that examined escalated, reduced, or interrupted therapy with etanercept, adalimumab, infliximab, ustekinumab, or alefacept. Data Synthesis: A total of 23 articles with 12,617 patients matched the inclusion and exclusion criteria for the systematic review. Data were examined for primary and secondary efficacy outcomes and adverse events including infections, malignancies, cardiovascular events, and anti-drug antibodies. The preponderance of data suggests that continuous treatment with anti-TNF agents and anti-IL12/23 agent was necessary for maintenance of disease control. Among non-responders, dose escalation with etanercept, adalimumab, ustekinumab, and alefacept typically resulted in greater efficacy than standard dosing. Dose reduction with etanercept and alefacept resulted in reduced efficacy. Withdrawal of the examined biologics led to an increase in disease activity; efficacy from retreatment did not result in equivalent initial response rates for most biologics. Safety data on off-label dosing regimens are limited. Conclusion: Dose escalation in non-responders generally resulted in increased efficacy in the examined biologics used to treat moderate-to-severe psoriasis. Continuous treatment with anti-TNF agents and anti-IL12/23 agent results in superior efficacy over interrupted therapy. The decision to use off-label dosing needs to account for both benefits and risks and be individualized to patients' disease severity, quality of life, and existence of comorbidities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere33486
JournalPLoS One
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

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psoriasis
Biological Therapy
systematic review
Psoriasis
Labels
Safety
therapeutics
Biological Products
dosage
Interleukin-12
Disease control
Therapeutics
prospective studies
quality of life
Cardiovascular Infections
disease severity
Off-Label Use
disease control
Retreatment
Information Storage and Retrieval

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Off-label biologic regimens in psoriasis : A systematic review of efficacy and safety of dose escalation, reduction, and interrupted biologic therapy. / Brezinski, Elizabeth A.; Armstrong, April W.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 7, No. 4, e33486, 2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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