Occupation, income, and education as independent covariates of arthritis in four national probability samples

J Paul Leigh, James F. Fries

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The strong associations between education level and prevalence and severity of arthritis have recently been investigated, with some suggestion that the relationships might be causal. Data from 4 national probability samples were analyzed, in which occupation and income were measured currently and prior to the development of arthritis. These data indicate that previous studies overestimated the strength of the association between schooling and arthritis because income and, especially, occupation were not analyzed as separate covariates. The overestimate appears to be especially high for persons currently employed, for men, and for persons employed in dangerous jobs. Health policy strategies directed toward reducing arthritis rates require not simply a focus on education, but the additional socioeconomic status dimensions of income and occupational safety and health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)984-995
Number of pages12
JournalArthritis and Rheumatism
Volume34
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Sampling Studies
Occupations
Arthritis
Education
Occupational Health
Health Policy
Social Class

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Occupation, income, and education as independent covariates of arthritis in four national probability samples. / Leigh, J Paul; Fries, James F.

In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, Vol. 34, No. 8, 08.1991, p. 984-995.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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