Observations on the dose-response curve for arsenic exposure and lung cancer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Occupational studies in three countries have related quantitative estimates of arsenic exposure to lung cancer risks. Mine exposures in China appear to incur a higher relative risk than arsenic exposures elsewhere. Two studies are also consistent with a linear relationship over an elevated background risk of lung cancer among arsenic-exposed workers. Plausible explanations include synergism (with smoking) which varies in magnitude according to the level of arsenic exposure, long-term survivorship in higher exposure jobs among the healthier, less susceptible individuals, exposure estimate errors that were more prominent at higher exposure levels as a result of past industrial hygiene sampling or worker protection practices. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationScandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health
Pages217-226
Number of pages10
Volume19
Edition4
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Arsenic
arsenic
cancer
Lung Neoplasms
worker
Industrial hygiene
hygiene
smoking
Occupational Health
China
Smoking
Sampling
synergism
dose
exposure
survivorship
sampling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Toxicology
  • Geography, Planning and Development

Cite this

Hertz-Picciotto, I., & Smith, A. H. (1993). Observations on the dose-response curve for arsenic exposure and lung cancer. In Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health (4 ed., Vol. 19, pp. 217-226)

Observations on the dose-response curve for arsenic exposure and lung cancer. / Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Smith, A. H.

Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health. Vol. 19 4. ed. 1993. p. 217-226.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Hertz-Picciotto, I & Smith, AH 1993, Observations on the dose-response curve for arsenic exposure and lung cancer. in Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health. 4 edn, vol. 19, pp. 217-226.
Hertz-Picciotto I, Smith AH. Observations on the dose-response curve for arsenic exposure and lung cancer. In Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health. 4 ed. Vol. 19. 1993. p. 217-226
Hertz-Picciotto, Irva ; Smith, A. H. / Observations on the dose-response curve for arsenic exposure and lung cancer. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health. Vol. 19 4. ed. 1993. pp. 217-226
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