Obesity as a risk factor for dementia: Mechanisms and clinical implications

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Recent work has indicated that obesity increases risk of all cause dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD), and neurodegenerative processes in the brain. Given the current epidemic of obesity, and the expected age-related increase in dementia, even a modest association between these two conditions has far reaching public health implications. However, due to the effects of both AD associated weight loss and age-related changes in body composition there are methodological challenges in assessing obesity as a risk factor in the etiology of dementia. There is a need to take a 'life course approach' and to consider the role of risk factors prior to old age. Our work has indicated that obesity measured in middle-age is strongly associated with risk of dementia, independent of the development of diabetes and cardiovascular-related morbidities. This paper briefly reviews the evidence, and clinical implications of obesity as a risk factor for dementia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationResearch and Practice in Alzheimer's Disease
EditorsB. Vellas, E. Giacobini
Pages92-97
Number of pages6
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameResearch and Practice in Alzheimer's Disease
Volume11
ISSN (Print)1284-8360

Fingerprint

Dementia
Obesity
Alzheimer Disease
Body Composition
Weight Loss
Public Health
Morbidity
Brain

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Body mass index
  • Dementia
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Whitmer, R. (2006). Obesity as a risk factor for dementia: Mechanisms and clinical implications. In B. Vellas, & E. Giacobini (Eds.), Research and Practice in Alzheimer's Disease (pp. 92-97). (Research and Practice in Alzheimer's Disease; Vol. 11).

Obesity as a risk factor for dementia : Mechanisms and clinical implications. / Whitmer, Rachel.

Research and Practice in Alzheimer's Disease. ed. / B. Vellas; E. Giacobini. 2006. p. 92-97 (Research and Practice in Alzheimer's Disease; Vol. 11).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Whitmer, R 2006, Obesity as a risk factor for dementia: Mechanisms and clinical implications. in B Vellas & E Giacobini (eds), Research and Practice in Alzheimer's Disease. Research and Practice in Alzheimer's Disease, vol. 11, pp. 92-97.
Whitmer R. Obesity as a risk factor for dementia: Mechanisms and clinical implications. In Vellas B, Giacobini E, editors, Research and Practice in Alzheimer's Disease. 2006. p. 92-97. (Research and Practice in Alzheimer's Disease).
Whitmer, Rachel. / Obesity as a risk factor for dementia : Mechanisms and clinical implications. Research and Practice in Alzheimer's Disease. editor / B. Vellas ; E. Giacobini. 2006. pp. 92-97 (Research and Practice in Alzheimer's Disease).
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