Obesity and the use of health care services

Klea D Bertakis, Rahman Azari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

88 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study investigated differences in the use of health care services and associated costs between obese and nonobese patients. Research Methods and Procedures: New adult patients (N = 509) were randomly assigned to primary care physicians at a university medical center. Their use of medical services and related charges was monitored for 1 year. Data collected included sociodemographics, self-reported health status using the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36, evaluation for depression using the Beck Depression Index, and measured height and weight to calculate BMI. Results: Obese patients included a significantly higher percentage of women and had higher mean age, lower mean education, lower mean health status, and higher mean Beck Depression Index scores. Obese patients had a significantly higher mean number of visits to both primary care (p = 0.0005) and specialty care clinics (p = 0.0006), and a higher mean number of diagnostic services (p < 0.0001). Obese patients also had significantly higher primary care (p = 0.0058), specialty clinic (p = 0.0062), emergency department (p = 0.0484), hospitalization (p = 0.0485), diagnostic services (p = 0.0021), and total charges (p = 0.0033). Controlling for health status, depression, age, education, income, and sex, obesity was significantly related to the use of primary care (p = 0.0364) and diagnostic services (p = 0.0075). There was no statistically significant relationship between obesity and medical expenditures in any of the five categories or for total charges. Discussion: Obesity is a chronic condition requiring long-term management, with an emphasis on prevention. If this critical health issue is not appropriately addressed, the prevalence of obesity and obesity-related diseases will continue to grow, resulting in escalating use of health care services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)372-379
Number of pages8
JournalObesity Research
Volume13
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2005

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health services
Health Services
Diagnostic Services
obesity
Obesity
Delivery of Health Care
health status
Depression
Health Status
Primary Health Care
education
obesity-related diseases
Sex Education
Primary Care Physicians
research methods
Health Expenditures
physicians
Hospital Emergency Service
income
Hospitalization

Keywords

  • Costs and cost analysis
  • Health care costs
  • Health care resource use
  • Primary care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Endocrinology
  • Food Science
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Obesity and the use of health care services. / Bertakis, Klea D; Azari, Rahman.

In: Obesity Research, Vol. 13, No. 2, 2005, p. 372-379.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bertakis, KD & Azari, R 2005, 'Obesity and the use of health care services', Obesity Research, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 372-379.
Bertakis, Klea D ; Azari, Rahman. / Obesity and the use of health care services. In: Obesity Research. 2005 ; Vol. 13, No. 2. pp. 372-379.
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