Nurse–physician collaboration in an academic medical centre: The influence of organisational and individual factors

Darci Bowles, Georgia McIntosh, Reena Hemrajani, Miao Shan Yen, Allison Phillips, Nathan Schwartz, Shin-Ping Tu, Alan W. Dow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ineffective physician–nurse collaboration has been recognised to adversely impact patient and organisational outcomes, and some studies suggest an underlying factor may be that nurses and physicians have different perceptions of interprofessional collaboration (IPC). The objectives of this study were to evaluate for a difference in the perception of IPC between physicians and nurses and to explore potential contributing factors at the individual and organisational levels to any observed difference. Data including measures of perceptions of IPC were collected from a convenience sample of resident physicians (n = 47), attending physicians (n = 18), and nurses (n = 54) providing care for internal medicine patients in a large tertiary care academic medical centre. Regression analysis revealed significantly lower perceptions of IPC scores for nurses in comparison to the scores of both the resident and attending physician groups (p = .0001 for both). Although demographic and workload factors also differed by profession, only profession and workload remained significant in regression analysis. Given the known relationships between effective physician–nurse collaboration and superior patient and organisational outcomes, better defining the individual and organisational predictors of IPC scores may support development of more effective interventions targeting improvements in IPC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)655-660
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Interprofessional Care
Volume30
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Physicians
Nurses
Workload
Regression Analysis
Tertiary Healthcare
Internal Medicine
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • Collaboration
  • interprofessional
  • nurse
  • physician
  • quantitative methodology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Nurse–physician collaboration in an academic medical centre : The influence of organisational and individual factors. / Bowles, Darci; McIntosh, Georgia; Hemrajani, Reena; Yen, Miao Shan; Phillips, Allison; Schwartz, Nathan; Tu, Shin-Ping; Dow, Alan W.

In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, Vol. 30, No. 5, 02.09.2016, p. 655-660.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bowles, Darci ; McIntosh, Georgia ; Hemrajani, Reena ; Yen, Miao Shan ; Phillips, Allison ; Schwartz, Nathan ; Tu, Shin-Ping ; Dow, Alan W. / Nurse–physician collaboration in an academic medical centre : The influence of organisational and individual factors. In: Journal of Interprofessional Care. 2016 ; Vol. 30, No. 5. pp. 655-660.
@article{19313d25d40d42a2a701649d4eb257a6,
title = "Nurse–physician collaboration in an academic medical centre: The influence of organisational and individual factors",
abstract = "Ineffective physician–nurse collaboration has been recognised to adversely impact patient and organisational outcomes, and some studies suggest an underlying factor may be that nurses and physicians have different perceptions of interprofessional collaboration (IPC). The objectives of this study were to evaluate for a difference in the perception of IPC between physicians and nurses and to explore potential contributing factors at the individual and organisational levels to any observed difference. Data including measures of perceptions of IPC were collected from a convenience sample of resident physicians (n = 47), attending physicians (n = 18), and nurses (n = 54) providing care for internal medicine patients in a large tertiary care academic medical centre. Regression analysis revealed significantly lower perceptions of IPC scores for nurses in comparison to the scores of both the resident and attending physician groups (p = .0001 for both). Although demographic and workload factors also differed by profession, only profession and workload remained significant in regression analysis. Given the known relationships between effective physician–nurse collaboration and superior patient and organisational outcomes, better defining the individual and organisational predictors of IPC scores may support development of more effective interventions targeting improvements in IPC.",
keywords = "Collaboration, interprofessional, nurse, physician, quantitative methodology",
author = "Darci Bowles and Georgia McIntosh and Reena Hemrajani and Yen, {Miao Shan} and Allison Phillips and Nathan Schwartz and Shin-Ping Tu and Dow, {Alan W.}",
year = "2016",
month = "9",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1080/13561820.2016.1201464",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "30",
pages = "655--660",
journal = "Journal of Interprofessional Care",
issn = "1356-1820",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nurse–physician collaboration in an academic medical centre

T2 - The influence of organisational and individual factors

AU - Bowles, Darci

AU - McIntosh, Georgia

AU - Hemrajani, Reena

AU - Yen, Miao Shan

AU - Phillips, Allison

AU - Schwartz, Nathan

AU - Tu, Shin-Ping

AU - Dow, Alan W.

PY - 2016/9/2

Y1 - 2016/9/2

N2 - Ineffective physician–nurse collaboration has been recognised to adversely impact patient and organisational outcomes, and some studies suggest an underlying factor may be that nurses and physicians have different perceptions of interprofessional collaboration (IPC). The objectives of this study were to evaluate for a difference in the perception of IPC between physicians and nurses and to explore potential contributing factors at the individual and organisational levels to any observed difference. Data including measures of perceptions of IPC were collected from a convenience sample of resident physicians (n = 47), attending physicians (n = 18), and nurses (n = 54) providing care for internal medicine patients in a large tertiary care academic medical centre. Regression analysis revealed significantly lower perceptions of IPC scores for nurses in comparison to the scores of both the resident and attending physician groups (p = .0001 for both). Although demographic and workload factors also differed by profession, only profession and workload remained significant in regression analysis. Given the known relationships between effective physician–nurse collaboration and superior patient and organisational outcomes, better defining the individual and organisational predictors of IPC scores may support development of more effective interventions targeting improvements in IPC.

AB - Ineffective physician–nurse collaboration has been recognised to adversely impact patient and organisational outcomes, and some studies suggest an underlying factor may be that nurses and physicians have different perceptions of interprofessional collaboration (IPC). The objectives of this study were to evaluate for a difference in the perception of IPC between physicians and nurses and to explore potential contributing factors at the individual and organisational levels to any observed difference. Data including measures of perceptions of IPC were collected from a convenience sample of resident physicians (n = 47), attending physicians (n = 18), and nurses (n = 54) providing care for internal medicine patients in a large tertiary care academic medical centre. Regression analysis revealed significantly lower perceptions of IPC scores for nurses in comparison to the scores of both the resident and attending physician groups (p = .0001 for both). Although demographic and workload factors also differed by profession, only profession and workload remained significant in regression analysis. Given the known relationships between effective physician–nurse collaboration and superior patient and organisational outcomes, better defining the individual and organisational predictors of IPC scores may support development of more effective interventions targeting improvements in IPC.

KW - Collaboration

KW - interprofessional

KW - nurse

KW - physician

KW - quantitative methodology

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84978966800&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84978966800&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/13561820.2016.1201464

DO - 10.1080/13561820.2016.1201464

M3 - Article

C2 - 27388560

AN - SCOPUS:84978966800

VL - 30

SP - 655

EP - 660

JO - Journal of Interprofessional Care

JF - Journal of Interprofessional Care

SN - 1356-1820

IS - 5

ER -