Nuclear magnetic resonance as a measure of cerebral metabolism: Effects of hypertonic saline resuscitation

David H Wisner, F. D. Battistella, S. P. Freshman, C. J. Weber, R. J. Kauten

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Fears of central nervous system dysfunction from acute hypernatremia and hyperosmolarity with hypertonic saline resuscitation are often cited. We used high-energy phosphate nuclear magnetic resonance to investigate resuscitation effects on cerebral metabolism. Rats were instrumented for hemodynamic monitoring and fluid infusion and a phosphorus surface coil placed on their skulls. After shimming, baseline spectra were obtained. Animals were then bled for one hour to a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 45 mm Hg, followed by resuscitation for one hour to a MAP of 75 mm Hg with lactated Ringer's (LR, n = 17) or 7.5% hypertonic saline (HS, n = 25). Spectra were obtained again and analyzed for the ratio of high-energy phosphocreatine (PCr) to low-energy inorganic phosphate (P(i)). Intracellular hydrogen ion concentration [H+] was calculated from the PCr/P(i) shift. Conclusions: (1) Hypertonic saline results in a decreased intracellular pH compared with LR without associated changes in high-energy phosphate metabolism. (2) Decreases in pH may be the result of cell dehydration rather than metabolic dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-358
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Trauma
Volume32
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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