Nuclear magnetic resonance as a measure of cerebral metabolism: Effects of hypertonic saline resuscitation

David H Wisner, F. D. Battistella, S. P. Freshman, C. J. Weber, R. J. Kauten

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Fears of central nervous system dysfunction from acute hypernatremia and hyperosmolarity with hypertonic saline resuscitation are often cited. We used high-energy phosphate nuclear magnetic resonance to investigate resuscitation effects on cerebral metabolism. Rats were instrumented for hemodynamic monitoring and fluid infusion and a phosphorus surface coil placed on their skulls. After shimming, baseline spectra were obtained. Animals were then bled for one hour to a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 45 mm Hg, followed by resuscitation for one hour to a MAP of 75 mm Hg with lactated Ringer's (LR, n = 17) or 7.5% hypertonic saline (HS, n = 25). Spectra were obtained again and analyzed for the ratio of high-energy phosphocreatine (PCr) to low-energy inorganic phosphate (P(i)). Intracellular hydrogen ion concentration [H+] was calculated from the PCr/P(i) shift. Conclusions: (1) Hypertonic saline results in a decreased intracellular pH compared with LR without associated changes in high-energy phosphate metabolism. (2) Decreases in pH may be the result of cell dehydration rather than metabolic dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-358
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Trauma
Volume32
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1992

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Resuscitation
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Phosphocreatine
Phosphates
Arterial Pressure
Hypernatremia
Dehydration
Skull
Phosphorus
Energy Metabolism
Fear
Central Nervous System
Hemodynamics
Ringer's lactate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Wisner, D. H., Battistella, F. D., Freshman, S. P., Weber, C. J., & Kauten, R. J. (1992). Nuclear magnetic resonance as a measure of cerebral metabolism: Effects of hypertonic saline resuscitation. Journal of Trauma, 32(3), 351-358.

Nuclear magnetic resonance as a measure of cerebral metabolism : Effects of hypertonic saline resuscitation. / Wisner, David H; Battistella, F. D.; Freshman, S. P.; Weber, C. J.; Kauten, R. J.

In: Journal of Trauma, Vol. 32, No. 3, 1992, p. 351-358.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wisner, DH, Battistella, FD, Freshman, SP, Weber, CJ & Kauten, RJ 1992, 'Nuclear magnetic resonance as a measure of cerebral metabolism: Effects of hypertonic saline resuscitation', Journal of Trauma, vol. 32, no. 3, pp. 351-358.
Wisner, David H ; Battistella, F. D. ; Freshman, S. P. ; Weber, C. J. ; Kauten, R. J. / Nuclear magnetic resonance as a measure of cerebral metabolism : Effects of hypertonic saline resuscitation. In: Journal of Trauma. 1992 ; Vol. 32, No. 3. pp. 351-358.
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