Novel roles for immune molecules in neural development: Implications for neurodevelopmental disorders

Paula A. Garay, A Kimberley Usrey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

115 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although the brain has classically been considered "immune-privileged" , current research suggests an extensive communication between the immune and nervous systems in both health and disease. Recent studies demonstrate that immune molecules are present at the right place and time to modulate the development and function of the healthy and diseased central nervous system (CNS). Indeed, immune molecules play integral roles in the CNS throughout neural development, including affecting neurogenesis, neuronal migration, axon guidance, synapse formation, activity-dependent refinement of circuits, and synaptic plasticity. Moreover, the roles of individual immune molecules in the nervous system may change over development. This review focuses on the effects of immune molecules on neuronal connections in the mammalian central nervous system - specifically the roles for MHCI and its receptors, complement, and cytokines on the function, refinement, and plasticity of geniculate, cortical and hippocampal synapses, and their relationship to neurodevelopmental disorders. These functions for immune molecules during neural development suggest that they could also mediate pathological responses to chronic elevations of cytokines in neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberArticle 136
JournalFrontiers in Synaptic Neuroscience
Issue numberSEP
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Synapses
Nervous System
Central Nervous System
Complement Receptors
Cytokine Receptors
Neuronal Plasticity
Central Nervous System Diseases
Neurogenesis
Immune System
Schizophrenia
Communication
Cytokines
Health
Brain
Research
Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Axon Guidance
Autism Spectrum Disorder

Keywords

  • Autism
  • Complement
  • Cytokine
  • Major histocompatibility complex
  • Plasticity
  • Refinement
  • Schizophrenia
  • Synapse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Novel roles for immune molecules in neural development : Implications for neurodevelopmental disorders. / Garay, Paula A.; Usrey, A Kimberley.

In: Frontiers in Synaptic Neuroscience, No. SEP, Article 136, 2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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