Novel homologs of replication protein A in Archaea: Implications for the evolution of ssDNA-binding proteins

Frederic Chedin, Erica M. Seitz, Stephen C. Kowalczykowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In Bacteria and Eukarya, ssDNA-binding proteins are central to most aspects of DNA metabolism. Until recently, however, no counterpart of an ssDNA-binding protein had been identified in the third domain of life, Archaea. Here, we report the discovery of a novel type of ssDNA-binding protein in the genomes of several archaeons. These proteins, in contrast to all known members of this protein family, possess four conserved DNA-binding sites within a single polypeptide or, in one case, two polypeptides. This peculiar structural organization allows us to propose a model for the evolution of this class of proteins. Copyright (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)273-277
Number of pages5
JournalTrends in Biochemical Sciences
Volume23
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 1998

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Replication Protein A
Archaea
Carrier Proteins
Peptides
Proteins
DNA
Eukaryota
Metabolism
Bacteria
Genes
Binding Sites
Genome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Novel homologs of replication protein A in Archaea : Implications for the evolution of ssDNA-binding proteins. / Chedin, Frederic; Seitz, Erica M.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

In: Trends in Biochemical Sciences, Vol. 23, No. 8, 01.08.1998, p. 273-277.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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