Not So Automatic Imitation: Expectation of Incongruence Reduces Interference in Both Autism Spectrum Disorder and Typical Development

Andrew Gordon, Raphael Geddert, Jeremy Hogeveen, Marie K. Krug, Sukhvinder Obhi, Marjorie Solomon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Research has observed evidence for both hypo-(supposedly due to a broken mirror neuron system) and hyper-(thought to be the result of deficits in adaptive control) imitation in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This work sought to adjudicate between these findings using an automatic imitation (AI) paradigm with the novel manipulation of the need to engage adaptive control of imitation. Results demonstrated that ASD participants do not display a specific deficit in AI capability, are able to engage in proactive control of AI, and that relative to a well-matched effector condition, AI is not selectively associated with ASD symptom severity. These data cast doubt upon the notion of impairments in imitation or its control in ASD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2020

Keywords

  • Automatic imitation
  • Cognitive control
  • Imitation
  • Proactive control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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