Noninvasive thermometry assisted by a dual-function ultrasound transducer for mild hyperthermia

Chun Yen Lai, Dustin E. Kruse, Charles F. Caskey, Douglas N. Stephens, Patrick L. Sutcliffe, Katherine W. Ferrara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mild hyperthermia is increasingly important for the activation of temperature-sensitive drug delivery vehicles. Noninvasive ultrasound thermometry based on a 2-D speckle tracking algorithm was examined in this study. Here, a commercial ultrasound scanner, a customized co-linear array transducer, and a controlling PC system were used to generate mild hyperthermia. Because the co-linear array transducer is capable of both therapy and imaging at widely separated frequencies, RF image frames were acquired during therapeutic insonation and then exported for off-line analysis. For in vivo studies in a mouse model, before temperature estimation, motion correction was applied between a reference RF frame and subsequent RF frames. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments were examined; in the in vitro and in vivo studies, the average temperature error had a standard deviation of 0.7°C and 0.8°C, respectively. The application of motion correction improved the accuracy of temperature estimation, where the error range was -1.9 to 4.5°C without correction compared with -1.1 to 1.0°C following correction. This study demonstrates the feasibility of combining therapy and monitoring using a commercial system. In the future, real-time temperature estimation will be incorporated into this system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number5610553
Pages (from-to)2671-2684
Number of pages14
JournalIEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control
Volume57
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2010

Fingerprint

hyperthermia
temperature measurement
Transducers
transducers
Ultrasonics
linear arrays
therapy
Temperature
temperature
range errors
Motion estimation
Speckle
Drug delivery
scanners
mice
standard deviation
delivery
vehicles
drugs
Chemical activation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics
  • Instrumentation

Cite this

Noninvasive thermometry assisted by a dual-function ultrasound transducer for mild hyperthermia. / Lai, Chun Yen; Kruse, Dustin E.; Caskey, Charles F.; Stephens, Douglas N.; Sutcliffe, Patrick L.; Ferrara, Katherine W.

In: IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control, Vol. 57, No. 12, 5610553, 12.2010, p. 2671-2684.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lai, Chun Yen ; Kruse, Dustin E. ; Caskey, Charles F. ; Stephens, Douglas N. ; Sutcliffe, Patrick L. ; Ferrara, Katherine W. / Noninvasive thermometry assisted by a dual-function ultrasound transducer for mild hyperthermia. In: IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control. 2010 ; Vol. 57, No. 12. pp. 2671-2684.
@article{840702b8f56b4b90822b3e364eb2703d,
title = "Noninvasive thermometry assisted by a dual-function ultrasound transducer for mild hyperthermia",
abstract = "Mild hyperthermia is increasingly important for the activation of temperature-sensitive drug delivery vehicles. Noninvasive ultrasound thermometry based on a 2-D speckle tracking algorithm was examined in this study. Here, a commercial ultrasound scanner, a customized co-linear array transducer, and a controlling PC system were used to generate mild hyperthermia. Because the co-linear array transducer is capable of both therapy and imaging at widely separated frequencies, RF image frames were acquired during therapeutic insonation and then exported for off-line analysis. For in vivo studies in a mouse model, before temperature estimation, motion correction was applied between a reference RF frame and subsequent RF frames. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments were examined; in the in vitro and in vivo studies, the average temperature error had a standard deviation of 0.7°C and 0.8°C, respectively. The application of motion correction improved the accuracy of temperature estimation, where the error range was -1.9 to 4.5°C without correction compared with -1.1 to 1.0°C following correction. This study demonstrates the feasibility of combining therapy and monitoring using a commercial system. In the future, real-time temperature estimation will be incorporated into this system.",
author = "Lai, {Chun Yen} and Kruse, {Dustin E.} and Caskey, {Charles F.} and Stephens, {Douglas N.} and Sutcliffe, {Patrick L.} and Ferrara, {Katherine W.}",
year = "2010",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1109/TUFFC.2010.1741",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "57",
pages = "2671--2684",
journal = "IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control",
issn = "0885-3010",
publisher = "Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Noninvasive thermometry assisted by a dual-function ultrasound transducer for mild hyperthermia

AU - Lai, Chun Yen

AU - Kruse, Dustin E.

AU - Caskey, Charles F.

AU - Stephens, Douglas N.

AU - Sutcliffe, Patrick L.

AU - Ferrara, Katherine W.

PY - 2010/12

Y1 - 2010/12

N2 - Mild hyperthermia is increasingly important for the activation of temperature-sensitive drug delivery vehicles. Noninvasive ultrasound thermometry based on a 2-D speckle tracking algorithm was examined in this study. Here, a commercial ultrasound scanner, a customized co-linear array transducer, and a controlling PC system were used to generate mild hyperthermia. Because the co-linear array transducer is capable of both therapy and imaging at widely separated frequencies, RF image frames were acquired during therapeutic insonation and then exported for off-line analysis. For in vivo studies in a mouse model, before temperature estimation, motion correction was applied between a reference RF frame and subsequent RF frames. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments were examined; in the in vitro and in vivo studies, the average temperature error had a standard deviation of 0.7°C and 0.8°C, respectively. The application of motion correction improved the accuracy of temperature estimation, where the error range was -1.9 to 4.5°C without correction compared with -1.1 to 1.0°C following correction. This study demonstrates the feasibility of combining therapy and monitoring using a commercial system. In the future, real-time temperature estimation will be incorporated into this system.

AB - Mild hyperthermia is increasingly important for the activation of temperature-sensitive drug delivery vehicles. Noninvasive ultrasound thermometry based on a 2-D speckle tracking algorithm was examined in this study. Here, a commercial ultrasound scanner, a customized co-linear array transducer, and a controlling PC system were used to generate mild hyperthermia. Because the co-linear array transducer is capable of both therapy and imaging at widely separated frequencies, RF image frames were acquired during therapeutic insonation and then exported for off-line analysis. For in vivo studies in a mouse model, before temperature estimation, motion correction was applied between a reference RF frame and subsequent RF frames. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments were examined; in the in vitro and in vivo studies, the average temperature error had a standard deviation of 0.7°C and 0.8°C, respectively. The application of motion correction improved the accuracy of temperature estimation, where the error range was -1.9 to 4.5°C without correction compared with -1.1 to 1.0°C following correction. This study demonstrates the feasibility of combining therapy and monitoring using a commercial system. In the future, real-time temperature estimation will be incorporated into this system.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78650409810&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78650409810&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1109/TUFFC.2010.1741

DO - 10.1109/TUFFC.2010.1741

M3 - Article

C2 - 21156363

AN - SCOPUS:78650409810

VL - 57

SP - 2671

EP - 2684

JO - IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control

JF - IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control

SN - 0885-3010

IS - 12

M1 - 5610553

ER -