Noninfectious serious hazards of transfusion.

Kim Janatpour, Paul V. Holland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Serious, noninfectious transfusion complications include transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease, anaphylaxis, hemolysis, and post-transfusion purpura. Prompt recognition and treatment are crucial, but prevention is preferable. Many transfusion reactions are not recognized as such, perhaps because signs and symptoms mimic other clinical conditions. However, any unexpected symptoms in a transfusion recipient should at least be considered as a possible transfusion reaction and be evaluated. Appropriate diagnosis is the key to treatment and may prevent additional reactions, not only in the patient, but possibly, as in the case of TRALI, in other patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)149-155
Number of pages7
JournalCurr Hematol Rep
Volume1
Issue number2
StatePublished - Nov 2002

Fingerprint

Acute Lung Injury
Purpura
Anaphylaxis
Graft vs Host Disease
Hemolysis
Signs and Symptoms
Therapeutics
Transfusion Reaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Janatpour, K., & Holland, P. V. (2002). Noninfectious serious hazards of transfusion. Curr Hematol Rep, 1(2), 149-155.

Noninfectious serious hazards of transfusion. / Janatpour, Kim; Holland, Paul V.

In: Curr Hematol Rep, Vol. 1, No. 2, 11.2002, p. 149-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Janatpour, K & Holland, PV 2002, 'Noninfectious serious hazards of transfusion.', Curr Hematol Rep, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 149-155.
Janatpour K, Holland PV. Noninfectious serious hazards of transfusion. Curr Hematol Rep. 2002 Nov;1(2):149-155.
Janatpour, Kim ; Holland, Paul V. / Noninfectious serious hazards of transfusion. In: Curr Hematol Rep. 2002 ; Vol. 1, No. 2. pp. 149-155.
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