No evidence for blood flow redistribution with isoflurane or halothane during acute coronary artery occlusion in fentanyl-anesthetized dogs

Peter G Moore, N. D. Kien, J. A. Reitan, D. A. White, A. M. Safwat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study examines the postulate that isoflurance, in contrast to halothane, causes redistribution of blood flow away from an ischemic myocardial region through vasodilation of adjacent normally perfused myocardium. The study was performed in open-chest dogs anesthetized with fentanyl; ischemia was induced by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. At 0.6% alveolar concentration, isoflurane increased transmural blood flow to 125% of control values (P < 0.05) in the normal region without concomitant changes in blood flow to the ischemic region or in the endocardial/epicardial flow ratio in the ischemic region. The evidence excludes either transmural steal or regional redistribution phenomena. Myocardial blood flow variables returned to control values at 1.8% isoflurane, and no blood flow redistribution effects were evident. In contrast, whereas halothane 0.4% caused no significant effect on myocardial blood flows, an alveolar concentration of 1.2% decreased transmural blood flow to normally perfused left ventricle to 70% of control (P < 0.05). Regional myocardial oxygen consumption in the normal and ischemic areas decreased at higher alveolar concentrations and was unchanged at the lower concentrations for both agents. Myocardial lactate production from the ischemic region was unchanged with either agent, suggesting that, in terms of metabolic changes, neither agent worsened ischemia during sustained occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. The present data show no evidence for worsening of myocardial ischemia with either isoflurane or halothane. Isoflurane causes a relatively greater increase in perfusion compared to myocardial oxygen consumption of normally perfused myocardium; nevertheless, sufficient coronary vascular reserve remains in the native collateral circulation so that myocardial metabolic supply-and-demand relationships during ischemia are not further compromised.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)854-865
Number of pages12
JournalAnesthesiology
Volume75
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1991

Keywords

  • Anesthetics, volatile: halothane; isoflurane
  • Heart, blood flow: coronary
  • Heart, ischemia: lactate productions; oxygen consumption

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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