NIH EXAMINER: Conceptualization and development of an executive function battery

Joel H. Kramer, Dan M Mungas, Katherine L. Possin, Katherine P. Rankin, Adam L. Boxer, Howard J. Rosen, Alan Bostrom, Lena Sinha, Ashley Berhel, Mary Widmeyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Executive functioning is widely targeted when human cognition is assessed, but there is little consensus on how it should be operationalized and measured. Recognizing the difficulties associated with establishing standard operational definitions of executive functioning, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke entered into a contract with the University of California-San Francisco to develop psychometrically robust executive measurement tools that would be accepted by the neurology clinical trials and clinical research communities. This effort, entitled Executive Abilities: Measures and Instruments for Neurobehavioral Evaluation and Research (EXAMINER), resulted in a series of tasks targeting working memory, inhibition, set shifting, fluency, insight, planning, social cognition and behavior. We describe battery conceptualization and development, data collection, scale construction based on item response theory, and lay the foundation for studying the battery's utility and validity for specific assessment and research goals. (JINS, 2013, 19, 1-9)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11-19
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

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Aptitude
Executive Function
research and development
Cognition
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
San Francisco
ability
Neurology
Contracts
evaluation
Short-Term Memory
Research
Consensus
Clinical Trials
scale construction
neurology
social cognition
stroke
social behavior
cognition

Keywords

  • cognitive control
  • fluency
  • item response theory
  • planning
  • social cognition
  • working memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

NIH EXAMINER : Conceptualization and development of an executive function battery. / Kramer, Joel H.; Mungas, Dan M; Possin, Katherine L.; Rankin, Katherine P.; Boxer, Adam L.; Rosen, Howard J.; Bostrom, Alan; Sinha, Lena; Berhel, Ashley; Widmeyer, Mary.

In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Vol. 20, No. 1, 01.2014, p. 11-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kramer, JH, Mungas, DM, Possin, KL, Rankin, KP, Boxer, AL, Rosen, HJ, Bostrom, A, Sinha, L, Berhel, A & Widmeyer, M 2014, 'NIH EXAMINER: Conceptualization and development of an executive function battery', Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 11-19. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1355617713001094
Kramer, Joel H. ; Mungas, Dan M ; Possin, Katherine L. ; Rankin, Katherine P. ; Boxer, Adam L. ; Rosen, Howard J. ; Bostrom, Alan ; Sinha, Lena ; Berhel, Ashley ; Widmeyer, Mary. / NIH EXAMINER : Conceptualization and development of an executive function battery. In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society. 2014 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 11-19.
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