Nighttime sleep-wake patterns and self-soothing from birth to one year of age: A longitudinal intervention study

Melissa M. Burnham, Beth L. Goodlin-Jones, Erika E. Gaylor, Thomas F. Anders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

171 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The objectives of this study were to: (1) describe the longitudinal development of sleep-wake patterns of solitary-sleeping infants from 1 to 12 months of age, (2) identify effects on sleep patterns and on self-soothing behaviors of introducing a novel sleep aid, and (3) identify predictive factors of self-soothing at 12 months using a transactional model as a guide. Methods: Eighty infants' nighttime sleep-wake patterns and associated variables were studied at 5 times across the first year of life using videosomnography and questionnaires. Results: Sleep-wake state developmental changes, as reported in investigations of infant sleep, were replicated, although a great deal of individual variability in the development of all sleep-related variables was noted. No major effects on sleep or on self-soothing behavior were evident from the introduction of the novel sleep aid. Three variables were identified as significant predictors of self-soothing at 12 months: decreasing amounts of time spent out of crib across the first year, high levels of quiet sleep at birth, and longer parental response times to infant awakenings at 3 months. Conclusions: These data lend preliminary support for the transactional model and suggest that infant and parental factors interact to influence the development of self-soothing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)713-725
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines
Volume43
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2002

Keywords

  • Infancy
  • Normal development
  • Paediatrics
  • Parent-child interaction
  • Sleep
  • Temperament

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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