New challenges in studying nutrition-disease interactions in the developing world

Andrew M. Prentice, M. Eric Gershwin, Ulrich E. Schaible, Gerald T. Keusch, Cesar G. Victora, Jeffrey I. Gordon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Latest estimates indicate that nutritional deficiencies account for 3 million child deaths each year in less-developed countries. Targeted nutritional interventions could therefore save millions of lives. However, such interventions require careful optimization to maximize benefit and avoid harm. Progress toward designing effective life-saving interventions is currently hampered by some serious gaps in our understanding of nutrient metabolism in humans. In this Personal Perspective, we highlight some of these gaps and make some proposals as to how improved research methods and technologies can be brought to bear on the problems of undernourished children in the developing world.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1322-1329
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Investigation
Volume118
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2008

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Malnutrition
Developing Countries
Technology
Food
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Prentice, A. M., Gershwin, M. E., Schaible, U. E., Keusch, G. T., Victora, C. G., & Gordon, J. I. (2008). New challenges in studying nutrition-disease interactions in the developing world. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 118(4), 1322-1329. https://doi.org/10.1172/JCI34034

New challenges in studying nutrition-disease interactions in the developing world. / Prentice, Andrew M.; Gershwin, M. Eric; Schaible, Ulrich E.; Keusch, Gerald T.; Victora, Cesar G.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, Vol. 118, No. 4, 01.04.2008, p. 1322-1329.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Prentice, AM, Gershwin, ME, Schaible, UE, Keusch, GT, Victora, CG & Gordon, JI 2008, 'New challenges in studying nutrition-disease interactions in the developing world', Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 118, no. 4, pp. 1322-1329. https://doi.org/10.1172/JCI34034
Prentice, Andrew M. ; Gershwin, M. Eric ; Schaible, Ulrich E. ; Keusch, Gerald T. ; Victora, Cesar G. ; Gordon, Jeffrey I. / New challenges in studying nutrition-disease interactions in the developing world. In: Journal of Clinical Investigation. 2008 ; Vol. 118, No. 4. pp. 1322-1329.
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