Neurotoxicity of polychlorinated biphenyls and related organohalogens

Isaac N. Pessah, Pamela J. Lein, Richard F. Seegal, Sharon K. Sagiv

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Halogenated organic compounds are pervasive in natural and built environments. Despite restrictions on the production of many of these compounds in most parts of the world through the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), many “legacy” compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), are routinely detected in human tissues where they continue to pose significant health risks to highly exposed and susceptible populations. A major concern is developmental neurotoxicity, although impacts on neurodegenerative outcomes have also been noted. Here, we review human studies of prenatal and adult exposures to PCBs and describe the state of knowledge regarding outcomes across domains related to cognition (e.g., IQ, language, memory, learning), attention, behavioral regulation and executive function, and social behavior, including traits related to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We also review current understanding of molecular mechanisms underpinning these associations, with a focus on dopaminergic neurotransmission, thyroid hormone disruption, calcium dyshomeostasis, and oxidative stress. Finally, we briefly consider contemporary sources of organohalogens that may pose human health risks via mechanisms of neurotoxicity common to those ascribed to PCBs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)363-387
Number of pages25
JournalActa Neuropathologica
Volume138
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2019

Fingerprint

Polychlorinated Biphenyls
Social Behavior
Executive Function
Health
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Thyroid Hormones
Synaptic Transmission
Cognition
Oxidative Stress
Language
Learning
Calcium
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Neurotoxicity of polychlorinated biphenyls and related organohalogens. / Pessah, Isaac N.; Lein, Pamela J.; Seegal, Richard F.; Sagiv, Sharon K.

In: Acta Neuropathologica, Vol. 138, No. 3, 01.09.2019, p. 363-387.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Pessah, Isaac N. ; Lein, Pamela J. ; Seegal, Richard F. ; Sagiv, Sharon K. / Neurotoxicity of polychlorinated biphenyls and related organohalogens. In: Acta Neuropathologica. 2019 ; Vol. 138, No. 3. pp. 363-387.
@article{358de208a8644d4f9ce01275c49d83ad,
title = "Neurotoxicity of polychlorinated biphenyls and related organohalogens",
abstract = "Halogenated organic compounds are pervasive in natural and built environments. Despite restrictions on the production of many of these compounds in most parts of the world through the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), many “legacy” compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), are routinely detected in human tissues where they continue to pose significant health risks to highly exposed and susceptible populations. A major concern is developmental neurotoxicity, although impacts on neurodegenerative outcomes have also been noted. Here, we review human studies of prenatal and adult exposures to PCBs and describe the state of knowledge regarding outcomes across domains related to cognition (e.g., IQ, language, memory, learning), attention, behavioral regulation and executive function, and social behavior, including traits related to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We also review current understanding of molecular mechanisms underpinning these associations, with a focus on dopaminergic neurotransmission, thyroid hormone disruption, calcium dyshomeostasis, and oxidative stress. Finally, we briefly consider contemporary sources of organohalogens that may pose human health risks via mechanisms of neurotoxicity common to those ascribed to PCBs.",
author = "Pessah, {Isaac N.} and Lein, {Pamela J.} and Seegal, {Richard F.} and Sagiv, {Sharon K.}",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00401-019-01978-1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "138",
pages = "363--387",
journal = "Acta Neuropathologica",
issn = "0001-6322",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neurotoxicity of polychlorinated biphenyls and related organohalogens

AU - Pessah, Isaac N.

AU - Lein, Pamela J.

AU - Seegal, Richard F.

AU - Sagiv, Sharon K.

PY - 2019/9/1

Y1 - 2019/9/1

N2 - Halogenated organic compounds are pervasive in natural and built environments. Despite restrictions on the production of many of these compounds in most parts of the world through the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), many “legacy” compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), are routinely detected in human tissues where they continue to pose significant health risks to highly exposed and susceptible populations. A major concern is developmental neurotoxicity, although impacts on neurodegenerative outcomes have also been noted. Here, we review human studies of prenatal and adult exposures to PCBs and describe the state of knowledge regarding outcomes across domains related to cognition (e.g., IQ, language, memory, learning), attention, behavioral regulation and executive function, and social behavior, including traits related to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We also review current understanding of molecular mechanisms underpinning these associations, with a focus on dopaminergic neurotransmission, thyroid hormone disruption, calcium dyshomeostasis, and oxidative stress. Finally, we briefly consider contemporary sources of organohalogens that may pose human health risks via mechanisms of neurotoxicity common to those ascribed to PCBs.

AB - Halogenated organic compounds are pervasive in natural and built environments. Despite restrictions on the production of many of these compounds in most parts of the world through the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), many “legacy” compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), are routinely detected in human tissues where they continue to pose significant health risks to highly exposed and susceptible populations. A major concern is developmental neurotoxicity, although impacts on neurodegenerative outcomes have also been noted. Here, we review human studies of prenatal and adult exposures to PCBs and describe the state of knowledge regarding outcomes across domains related to cognition (e.g., IQ, language, memory, learning), attention, behavioral regulation and executive function, and social behavior, including traits related to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We also review current understanding of molecular mechanisms underpinning these associations, with a focus on dopaminergic neurotransmission, thyroid hormone disruption, calcium dyshomeostasis, and oxidative stress. Finally, we briefly consider contemporary sources of organohalogens that may pose human health risks via mechanisms of neurotoxicity common to those ascribed to PCBs.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85069830492&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85069830492&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00401-019-01978-1

DO - 10.1007/s00401-019-01978-1

M3 - Review article

C2 - 30976975

AN - SCOPUS:85069830492

VL - 138

SP - 363

EP - 387

JO - Acta Neuropathologica

JF - Acta Neuropathologica

SN - 0001-6322

IS - 3

ER -