Neurotologic follow-up after radiation of posterior fossa tumors

Carol Jackson, Karen Jo Doyle, Jack Shohet, Jerald Robinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Stereotactic radiation treatment, also known as gamma knife surgery or radiosurgery, has come into acceptance as a treatment alternative to surgical removal for posterior fossa tumors. The purpose of this article is to describe the role of the neurotologist in the optimal management of neurotologic complications after stereotactic radiation, as illustrated by five patients. Study Design: Retrospective chart review. Patients: Five patients who underwent stereotactic radiation of posterior fossa tumors. Main Outcome Measures: Presence or absence of neurotologic complications (tumor growth, hearing loss, imbalance/ataxia, vertigo, and facial paralysis) or neurosurgical complaints (facial numbness, motor weakness, headache, hydrocephalus, and subarachnoid cysts). Results: Postradiation neurotologic complaints included vertigo, imbalance/ataxia, and progressive hearing loss in four of the five patients. Continued tumor growth occurred in two patients; two patients had no growth; in one patient the tumor became smaller. The complications of facial nerve paralysis facial numbness, motor weakness, headache, hydrocephalus cerebellar edema, and posterior fossa arachnoid cyst formation occurred less frequently. Conclusions: Stereotactic radiation of posterior fossa tumors can produce significant neurotologic problems. It is imperative that neurotologists remain involved in the follow- up care of patients with posterior fossa tumors to offer optimal treatment alternatives for the neurotologic disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)260-264
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Otology
Volume21
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 2000

Fingerprint

Infratentorial Neoplasms
Radiation
Hypesthesia
Facial Paralysis
Vertigo
Ataxia
Hydrocephalus
Hearing Loss
Headache
Growth
Arachnoid Cysts
Neoplasms
Aftercare
Radiosurgery
Facial Nerve
Cysts
Edema
Therapeutics
Retrospective Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • Acoustic neuroma
  • Posterior fossa tumors
  • Radiation
  • Stereotactic radiosurgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Jackson, C., Doyle, K. J., Shohet, J., & Robinson, J. (2000). Neurotologic follow-up after radiation of posterior fossa tumors. American Journal of Otology, 21(2), 260-264.

Neurotologic follow-up after radiation of posterior fossa tumors. / Jackson, Carol; Doyle, Karen Jo; Shohet, Jack; Robinson, Jerald.

In: American Journal of Otology, Vol. 21, No. 2, 03.2000, p. 260-264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jackson, C, Doyle, KJ, Shohet, J & Robinson, J 2000, 'Neurotologic follow-up after radiation of posterior fossa tumors', American Journal of Otology, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 260-264.
Jackson C, Doyle KJ, Shohet J, Robinson J. Neurotologic follow-up after radiation of posterior fossa tumors. American Journal of Otology. 2000 Mar;21(2):260-264.
Jackson, Carol ; Doyle, Karen Jo ; Shohet, Jack ; Robinson, Jerald. / Neurotologic follow-up after radiation of posterior fossa tumors. In: American Journal of Otology. 2000 ; Vol. 21, No. 2. pp. 260-264.
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