Neuropathological basis of magnetic resonance images in aging and dementia

William J. Jagust, Ling Zheng, Danielle J Harvey, Wendy J. Mack, Harry V. Vinters, Michael W. Weiner, William G. Ellis, Chris Zarow, Dan M Mungas, Bruce R Reed, Joel H. Kramer, Norbert Schuff, Charles DeCarli, Helena C. Chui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

223 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is used widely for assessment of patients with cognitive impairment, but the pathological correlates are unclear, especially when multiple pathologies are present. Methods: This report includes 93 subjects from a longitudinally followed cohort recruited for the study of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and subcortical cerebrovascular disease (CVD). MR images were analyzed to quantify cortical gray matter volume, hippocampal volume, white matter hyperintensities, and lacunes. Neuropathological examination quantified CVD parenchymal pathology, AD pathology (defined as Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease scores and Braak and Braak stage), and hippocampal sclerosis. Subjects were pathologically classified as 12 healthy control subjects, 46 AD, 14 CVD, 9 mixed AD/CVD, and 12 cognitively impaired patients without significant AD/CVD pathology. Multivariate models tested associations between magnetic resonance and pathological findings across the entire sample. Results: Pathological correlates of cortical gray matter volume were AD, subcortical vascular pathology, and arteriosclerosis. Hippocampal volume was related to AD pathology and hippocampal sclerosis, and the effects of hippocampal sclerosis were greater for subjects with low levels of AD pathology. White matter hyperintensities were related to age and to white matter pathology. Number of MRI lacunes was related to subcortical vascular pathology. Interpretation: In this clinical setting, the presence of lacunes and white matter changes provide a good signal for vascular disease. The neuropathological basis of MR defined cerebral cortical and hippocampal atrophy in aging and dementia is complex, with several pathological processes converging on similar brain structures that mediate cognitive decline.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)72-80
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Neurology
Volume63
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2008

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Dementia
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Pathology
Alzheimer Disease
Sclerosis
Blood Vessels
Arteriosclerosis
Pathologic Processes
Vascular Diseases
Atrophy
Registries
Healthy Volunteers
Cohort Studies
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
White Matter
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Jagust, W. J., Zheng, L., Harvey, D. J., Mack, W. J., Vinters, H. V., Weiner, M. W., ... Chui, H. C. (2008). Neuropathological basis of magnetic resonance images in aging and dementia. Annals of Neurology, 63(1), 72-80. https://doi.org/10.1002/ana.21296

Neuropathological basis of magnetic resonance images in aging and dementia. / Jagust, William J.; Zheng, Ling; Harvey, Danielle J; Mack, Wendy J.; Vinters, Harry V.; Weiner, Michael W.; Ellis, William G.; Zarow, Chris; Mungas, Dan M; Reed, Bruce R; Kramer, Joel H.; Schuff, Norbert; DeCarli, Charles; Chui, Helena C.

In: Annals of Neurology, Vol. 63, No. 1, 01.2008, p. 72-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jagust, WJ, Zheng, L, Harvey, DJ, Mack, WJ, Vinters, HV, Weiner, MW, Ellis, WG, Zarow, C, Mungas, DM, Reed, BR, Kramer, JH, Schuff, N, DeCarli, C & Chui, HC 2008, 'Neuropathological basis of magnetic resonance images in aging and dementia', Annals of Neurology, vol. 63, no. 1, pp. 72-80. https://doi.org/10.1002/ana.21296
Jagust, William J. ; Zheng, Ling ; Harvey, Danielle J ; Mack, Wendy J. ; Vinters, Harry V. ; Weiner, Michael W. ; Ellis, William G. ; Zarow, Chris ; Mungas, Dan M ; Reed, Bruce R ; Kramer, Joel H. ; Schuff, Norbert ; DeCarli, Charles ; Chui, Helena C. / Neuropathological basis of magnetic resonance images in aging and dementia. In: Annals of Neurology. 2008 ; Vol. 63, No. 1. pp. 72-80.
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