Neurologists' assessment of their ability to provide high quality care

Steven P. Ringel, Barbara G. Vickrey, Michael Schembri, Richard L. Kravitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To assess levels of professional satisfaction and distress in a national sample of neurologists and to compare neurologists with other physicians. Methods: The authors used data from the 1996 through 1997 and 1998 through 1999 Community Tracking Study Physician Survey and analyzed responses in the two time frames to measures of career satisfaction, physician autonomy and communication, and ability to obtain needed services for patients. Results: Most physicians, including neurologists, are satisfied with careers in medicine. Neurologists feel they have more time to spend with patients than do other physicians but are more concerned than are other physicians about their ability to obtain needed services and to provide high-quality care for patients. One-third of all physicians feel that they cannot maintain the kind of continuing relationships with patients over time that are necessary for delivering high-quality care. Conclusion: The majority of physicians, including neurologists, are satisfied with medical practice today. Because some neurologists are experiencing significant professional distress, those factors that will enhance physician satisfaction, prevent burnout, and encourage high-quality interpersonal care need to be carefully examined and modified.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)612-615
Number of pages4
JournalNeurology
Volume61
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 9 2003

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Ringel, S. P., Vickrey, B. G., Schembri, M., & Kravitz, R. L. (2003). Neurologists' assessment of their ability to provide high quality care. Neurology, 61(5), 612-615.