Neural underpinnings of the evidence accumulator

Carlos D. Brody, Timothy Hanks

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Gradual accumulation of evidence favoring one or another choice is considered a core component of many different types of decisions, and has been the subject of many neurophysiological studies in non-human primates. But its neural circuit mechanisms remain mysterious. Investigating it in rodents has recently become possible, facilitating perturbation experiments to delineate the relevant causal circuit, as well as the application of other tools more readily available in rodents. In addition, advances in stimulus design and analysis have aided studying the relevant neural encoding. In complement to ongoing non-human primate studies, these newly available model systems and tools place the field at an exciting time that suggests that the dynamical circuit mechanisms underlying accumulation of evidence could soon be revealed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)149-157
Number of pages9
JournalCurrent Opinion in Neurobiology
Volume37
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

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Primates
Rodentia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Neural underpinnings of the evidence accumulator. / Brody, Carlos D.; Hanks, Timothy.

In: Current Opinion in Neurobiology, Vol. 37, 01.04.2016, p. 149-157.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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