Negative pressure temporary abdominal closure without continuous suction

A solution for damage control surgery in austere and far-forward settings

Edwin Robert Faulconer, A. J. Davidson, D. Bowley, Joseph M Galante

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The use of topical negative pressure dressings in temporary abdominal closure has been readily adopted worldwide; however, a method of continuous suction is typically required to provide a seal. We describe a method of temporary abdominal closure using readily available materials in the forward surgical environment which does not require continuous suction after application. This method of temporary abdominal closure provides the benefits of negative pressure temporary abdominal closure after damage control surgery without the need for continuous suction or specialised equipment. Its application in damage control surgery in austere or far-forward settings is suggested. The technique has potential applications for military surgeons as well as in humanitarian settings where the logistic supply chain may be fragile.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Suction
Pressure
Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • damage control laparotomy
  • military surgery
  • open abdomen
  • surgery
  • temporary abdominal closure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "The use of topical negative pressure dressings in temporary abdominal closure has been readily adopted worldwide; however, a method of continuous suction is typically required to provide a seal. We describe a method of temporary abdominal closure using readily available materials in the forward surgical environment which does not require continuous suction after application. This method of temporary abdominal closure provides the benefits of negative pressure temporary abdominal closure after damage control surgery without the need for continuous suction or specialised equipment. Its application in damage control surgery in austere or far-forward settings is suggested. The technique has potential applications for military surgeons as well as in humanitarian settings where the logistic supply chain may be fragile.",
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AU - Galante, Joseph M

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AB - The use of topical negative pressure dressings in temporary abdominal closure has been readily adopted worldwide; however, a method of continuous suction is typically required to provide a seal. We describe a method of temporary abdominal closure using readily available materials in the forward surgical environment which does not require continuous suction after application. This method of temporary abdominal closure provides the benefits of negative pressure temporary abdominal closure after damage control surgery without the need for continuous suction or specialised equipment. Its application in damage control surgery in austere or far-forward settings is suggested. The technique has potential applications for military surgeons as well as in humanitarian settings where the logistic supply chain may be fragile.

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