Near complete loss of retinal ganglion cells in the math5/brn3b double knockout elicits severe reductions of other cell types during retinal development

Ala Moshiri, Ernesto Gonzalez, Kunifumi Tagawa, Hidetaka Maeda, Minhua Wang, Laura J. Frishman, Steven W. Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Scopus citations

Abstract

Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are the first cell type to differentiate during retinal histogenesis. It has been postulated that specified RGCs subsequently influence the number and fate of the remaining progenitors to produce the rest of the retinal cell types. However, several genetic knockout models have argued against this developmental role for RGCs. Although it is known that RGCs secrete cellular factors implicated in cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation, until now, limited publications have shown that reductions in the RGC number cause significant changes in these processes. In this study, we observed that Math5 and Brn3b double null mice exhibited over a 99% reduction in the number of RGCs during development. This severe reduction of RGCs is accompanied by a drastic loss in the number of all other retinal cell types that was never seen before. Unlike Brn3b null or Math5 null animals, mice null for both alleles lack an optic nerve and have severe retinal dysfunction. Results of this study support the hypothesis that RGCs play a pivotal role in the late phase of mammalian retina development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)214-227
Number of pages14
JournalDevelopmental Biology
Volume316
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • ath5
  • atoh7
  • brn3b
  • Development
  • math5
  • Mouse
  • POU4f2
  • Progenitor
  • Retina
  • RGC

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology

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