Natural killer cells activated with interleukin 2 in vitro can be adoptively transferred and mediate hematopoietic histocompatibility-1 antigen-specific bone marrow rejection in vivo

William J Murphy, Vinav Kumar, Michael Bennett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

An adoptive transfer model was developed for examining natural killer (NK) cell-mediated bone marrow cell (BMC) graft rejection. Homogeneous populations of NK cells were obtained by culturing spleen cells from mice with severe combined immune deficiency in the presence of recombinant interleukin 2 for 7 days. These cells maintained a phenotypic (CD3-CD4-CD8-NK-2.1+ and asialo GM1+) and lytic pattern consistent with that of activated NK cells. The cells were infused into lethally irradiated recipients whose own NK cells were depleted by anti-NK-1.1 antibody treatment and could no longer reject marrow allografts. The transferred NK cells restored the ability of the hosts to reject BMC in a hematopoietic histocompatibility-1 (Hh-1) antigen-specific manner. Immunogenetic studies demonstrated that the rejection was a function of the donor, not host, NK cells. These studies demonstrate that NK cells can be cultured in vitro with recombinant interleukin 2 and are capable of mediating Hh-1-specific BMC rejection in vivo in the absence of other immune cell types.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1729-1734
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Immunology
Volume20
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 1990
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

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