Infection spontanée et expérimentale de la marmotte alpine (Marmota marmota) par le virus de l'hépatite de la marmotte nord-Américaine (Marmota monax) premiers résultats

Translated title of the contribution: Natural and experimental infection of the marmot (Marmota marmota) by the woodchuck hepatitis virus (Marmota monax)

Bruno B Chomel, Ch Trepo, Ch Pichoud, Ch Jacquet, P. Boulay, L. Joubert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Summer's discovery in 1978 of a DNA virus, very close to human Hepatitis B virus in a woodchuck population in the U.S.A. (Pennsylvania) was a confirmation of the first description made by Snyder at Penrose Research Laboratory (Philadelphia). It was the first animal model of human B hepatitis infection. The comparative study of morphological, ecological and ethological characteristics of the marmot (Marmota marmota) and the woodchuck (Marmota monax) enables an easy distinction between these two species. The natural infection of M. monax by the WHV shows that the woodchuck is a good model for human B hepatitis and should be extended to M. marmota. A sample of 24 marmots caught in the Alpes of Haute-Provence has not revealed any spontaneous infection in these animals by the woodchuck virus. The failure of experimental inoculation of the marmot (24 animals) with the WHV confirms the refractory status of this species (no viremia and very low and short serological response with or without an immunosuppressive treatment). These preliminary results require a confirmation in other animals of different age and geographical region and also by using more specific tests such as molecular hybridation, research on DNA polymerase and direct transfection trials.

Original languageFrench
Pages (from-to)179-194
Number of pages16
JournalComparative Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
Volume7
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1984
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Woodchuck hepatitis virus
Woodchuck Hepatitis B Virus
Marmota
Marmota monax
Infection
infection
hepatitis B
immunosuppressive agents
DNA viruses
viremia
DNA-directed DNA polymerase
animal age
Hepatitis B
transfection
animals
animal models
DNA Viruses
viruses
Viremia
DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase

Keywords

  • experimenta model of B hepatitis
  • Marmota marmota
  • Marmota monax
  • woodchuck hepatitis virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Immunology
  • Microbiology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

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title = "Infection spontan{\'e}e et exp{\'e}rimentale de la marmotte alpine (Marmota marmota) par le virus de l'h{\'e}patite de la marmotte nord-Am{\'e}ricaine (Marmota monax) premiers r{\'e}sultats",
abstract = "Summer's discovery in 1978 of a DNA virus, very close to human Hepatitis B virus in a woodchuck population in the U.S.A. (Pennsylvania) was a confirmation of the first description made by Snyder at Penrose Research Laboratory (Philadelphia). It was the first animal model of human B hepatitis infection. The comparative study of morphological, ecological and ethological characteristics of the marmot (Marmota marmota) and the woodchuck (Marmota monax) enables an easy distinction between these two species. The natural infection of M. monax by the WHV shows that the woodchuck is a good model for human B hepatitis and should be extended to M. marmota. A sample of 24 marmots caught in the Alpes of Haute-Provence has not revealed any spontaneous infection in these animals by the woodchuck virus. The failure of experimental inoculation of the marmot (24 animals) with the WHV confirms the refractory status of this species (no viremia and very low and short serological response with or without an immunosuppressive treatment). These preliminary results require a confirmation in other animals of different age and geographical region and also by using more specific tests such as molecular hybridation, research on DNA polymerase and direct transfection trials.",
keywords = "experimenta model of B hepatitis, Marmota marmota, Marmota monax, woodchuck hepatitis virus",
author = "Chomel, {Bruno B} and Ch Trepo and Ch Pichoud and Ch Jacquet and P. Boulay and L. Joubert",
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T1 - Infection spontanée et expérimentale de la marmotte alpine (Marmota marmota) par le virus de l'hépatite de la marmotte nord-Américaine (Marmota monax) premiers résultats

AU - Chomel, Bruno B

AU - Trepo, Ch

AU - Pichoud, Ch

AU - Jacquet, Ch

AU - Boulay, P.

AU - Joubert, L.

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AB - Summer's discovery in 1978 of a DNA virus, very close to human Hepatitis B virus in a woodchuck population in the U.S.A. (Pennsylvania) was a confirmation of the first description made by Snyder at Penrose Research Laboratory (Philadelphia). It was the first animal model of human B hepatitis infection. The comparative study of morphological, ecological and ethological characteristics of the marmot (Marmota marmota) and the woodchuck (Marmota monax) enables an easy distinction between these two species. The natural infection of M. monax by the WHV shows that the woodchuck is a good model for human B hepatitis and should be extended to M. marmota. A sample of 24 marmots caught in the Alpes of Haute-Provence has not revealed any spontaneous infection in these animals by the woodchuck virus. The failure of experimental inoculation of the marmot (24 animals) with the WHV confirms the refractory status of this species (no viremia and very low and short serological response with or without an immunosuppressive treatment). These preliminary results require a confirmation in other animals of different age and geographical region and also by using more specific tests such as molecular hybridation, research on DNA polymerase and direct transfection trials.

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