Nanoscopy of bacterial cells immobilized by holographic optical tweezers

Robin Diekmann, Deanna L. Wolfson, Christoph Spahn, Mike Heilemann, Mark Schüttpelz, Thomas R Huser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Imaging non-adherent cells by super-resolution far-field fluorescence microscopy is currently not possible because of their rapid movement while in suspension. Holographic optical tweezers (HOTs) enable the ability to freely control the number and position of optical traps, thus facilitating the unrestricted manipulation of cells in a volume around the focal plane. Here we show that immobilizing non-adherent cells by optical tweezers is sufficient to achieve optical resolution well below the diffraction limit using localization microscopy. Individual cells can be oriented arbitrarily but preferably either horizontally or vertically relative to the microscope's image plane, enabling access to sample sections that are impossible to achieve with conventional sample preparation and immobilization. This opens up new opportunities to super-resolve the nanoscale organization of chromosomal DNA in individual bacterial cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number13711
JournalNature Communications
Volume7
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 13 2016

Fingerprint

Optical Tweezers
Optical tweezers
Immobilized Cells
Fluorescence microscopy
cells
Suspensions
Microscopic examination
Microscopes
Diffraction
Imaging techniques
DNA
microscopy
immobilization
Fluorescence Microscopy
Immobilization
far fields
manipulators
Microscopy
deoxyribonucleic acid
microscopes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Diekmann, R., Wolfson, D. L., Spahn, C., Heilemann, M., Schüttpelz, M., & Huser, T. R. (2016). Nanoscopy of bacterial cells immobilized by holographic optical tweezers. Nature Communications, 7, [13711]. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms13711

Nanoscopy of bacterial cells immobilized by holographic optical tweezers. / Diekmann, Robin; Wolfson, Deanna L.; Spahn, Christoph; Heilemann, Mike; Schüttpelz, Mark; Huser, Thomas R.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 7, 13711, 13.12.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Diekmann, R, Wolfson, DL, Spahn, C, Heilemann, M, Schüttpelz, M & Huser, TR 2016, 'Nanoscopy of bacterial cells immobilized by holographic optical tweezers', Nature Communications, vol. 7, 13711. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms13711
Diekmann R, Wolfson DL, Spahn C, Heilemann M, Schüttpelz M, Huser TR. Nanoscopy of bacterial cells immobilized by holographic optical tweezers. Nature Communications. 2016 Dec 13;7. 13711. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms13711
Diekmann, Robin ; Wolfson, Deanna L. ; Spahn, Christoph ; Heilemann, Mike ; Schüttpelz, Mark ; Huser, Thomas R. / Nanoscopy of bacterial cells immobilized by holographic optical tweezers. In: Nature Communications. 2016 ; Vol. 7.
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