Nanoporous gold as a neural interface coating: Effects of topography, surface chemistry, and feature size

Christopher A R Chapman, Hao Chen, Marianna Stamou, Juergen Biener, Monika M. Biener, Pamela J Lein, Erkin Seker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Designing neural interfaces that maintain close physical coupling of neurons to an electrode surface remains a major challenge for both implantable and in vitro neural recording electrode arrays. Typically, low-impedance nanostructured electrode coatings rely on chemical cues from pharmaceuticals or surface-immobilized peptides to suppress glial scar tissue formation over the electrode surface (astrogliosis), which is an obstacle to reliable neuron-electrode coupling. Nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by an alloy corrosion process, is a promising candidate to reduce astrogliosis solely through topography by taking advantage of its tunable length scale. In the present in vitro study on np-Au's interaction with cortical neuron-glia co-cultures, we demonstrate that the nanostructure of np-Au achieves close physical coupling of neurons by maintaining a high neuron-to-astrocyte surface coverage ratio. Atomic layer deposition-based surface modification was employed to decouple the effect of morphology from surface chemistry. Additionally, length scale effects were systematically studied by controlling the characteristic feature size of np-Au through variations in the dealloying conditions. Our results show that np-Au nanotopography, not surface chemistry, reduces astrocyte surface coverage while maintaining high neuronal coverage and may enhance neuron-electrode coupling through nanostructure-mediated suppression of scar tissue formation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7093-7100
Number of pages8
JournalACS Applied Materials and Interfaces
Volume7
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 8 2015

Fingerprint

Surface chemistry
Gold
Topography
Neurons
Coatings
Electrodes
Nanostructures
Tissue
Atomic layer deposition
Drug products
Peptides
Surface treatment
Corrosion
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Cell-material interaction
  • Gliosis
  • Multifunctional biomaterial
  • Nanoporous gold
  • Nanostructure
  • Nanotopography
  • Neural electrode
  • Neuron-astrocyte co-culture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Nanoporous gold as a neural interface coating : Effects of topography, surface chemistry, and feature size. / Chapman, Christopher A R; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Biener, Juergen; Biener, Monika M.; Lein, Pamela J; Seker, Erkin.

In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, Vol. 7, No. 13, 08.04.2015, p. 7093-7100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chapman, Christopher A R ; Chen, Hao ; Stamou, Marianna ; Biener, Juergen ; Biener, Monika M. ; Lein, Pamela J ; Seker, Erkin. / Nanoporous gold as a neural interface coating : Effects of topography, surface chemistry, and feature size. In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces. 2015 ; Vol. 7, No. 13. pp. 7093-7100.
@article{bfe37676de744e2caa61d0ee459502f5,
title = "Nanoporous gold as a neural interface coating: Effects of topography, surface chemistry, and feature size",
abstract = "Designing neural interfaces that maintain close physical coupling of neurons to an electrode surface remains a major challenge for both implantable and in vitro neural recording electrode arrays. Typically, low-impedance nanostructured electrode coatings rely on chemical cues from pharmaceuticals or surface-immobilized peptides to suppress glial scar tissue formation over the electrode surface (astrogliosis), which is an obstacle to reliable neuron-electrode coupling. Nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by an alloy corrosion process, is a promising candidate to reduce astrogliosis solely through topography by taking advantage of its tunable length scale. In the present in vitro study on np-Au's interaction with cortical neuron-glia co-cultures, we demonstrate that the nanostructure of np-Au achieves close physical coupling of neurons by maintaining a high neuron-to-astrocyte surface coverage ratio. Atomic layer deposition-based surface modification was employed to decouple the effect of morphology from surface chemistry. Additionally, length scale effects were systematically studied by controlling the characteristic feature size of np-Au through variations in the dealloying conditions. Our results show that np-Au nanotopography, not surface chemistry, reduces astrocyte surface coverage while maintaining high neuronal coverage and may enhance neuron-electrode coupling through nanostructure-mediated suppression of scar tissue formation.",
keywords = "Cell-material interaction, Gliosis, Multifunctional biomaterial, Nanoporous gold, Nanostructure, Nanotopography, Neural electrode, Neuron-astrocyte co-culture",
author = "Chapman, {Christopher A R} and Hao Chen and Marianna Stamou and Juergen Biener and Biener, {Monika M.} and Lein, {Pamela J} and Erkin Seker",
year = "2015",
month = "4",
day = "8",
doi = "10.1021/acsami.5b00410",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
pages = "7093--7100",
journal = "ACS applied materials & interfaces",
issn = "1944-8244",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "13",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nanoporous gold as a neural interface coating

T2 - Effects of topography, surface chemistry, and feature size

AU - Chapman, Christopher A R

AU - Chen, Hao

AU - Stamou, Marianna

AU - Biener, Juergen

AU - Biener, Monika M.

AU - Lein, Pamela J

AU - Seker, Erkin

PY - 2015/4/8

Y1 - 2015/4/8

N2 - Designing neural interfaces that maintain close physical coupling of neurons to an electrode surface remains a major challenge for both implantable and in vitro neural recording electrode arrays. Typically, low-impedance nanostructured electrode coatings rely on chemical cues from pharmaceuticals or surface-immobilized peptides to suppress glial scar tissue formation over the electrode surface (astrogliosis), which is an obstacle to reliable neuron-electrode coupling. Nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by an alloy corrosion process, is a promising candidate to reduce astrogliosis solely through topography by taking advantage of its tunable length scale. In the present in vitro study on np-Au's interaction with cortical neuron-glia co-cultures, we demonstrate that the nanostructure of np-Au achieves close physical coupling of neurons by maintaining a high neuron-to-astrocyte surface coverage ratio. Atomic layer deposition-based surface modification was employed to decouple the effect of morphology from surface chemistry. Additionally, length scale effects were systematically studied by controlling the characteristic feature size of np-Au through variations in the dealloying conditions. Our results show that np-Au nanotopography, not surface chemistry, reduces astrocyte surface coverage while maintaining high neuronal coverage and may enhance neuron-electrode coupling through nanostructure-mediated suppression of scar tissue formation.

AB - Designing neural interfaces that maintain close physical coupling of neurons to an electrode surface remains a major challenge for both implantable and in vitro neural recording electrode arrays. Typically, low-impedance nanostructured electrode coatings rely on chemical cues from pharmaceuticals or surface-immobilized peptides to suppress glial scar tissue formation over the electrode surface (astrogliosis), which is an obstacle to reliable neuron-electrode coupling. Nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by an alloy corrosion process, is a promising candidate to reduce astrogliosis solely through topography by taking advantage of its tunable length scale. In the present in vitro study on np-Au's interaction with cortical neuron-glia co-cultures, we demonstrate that the nanostructure of np-Au achieves close physical coupling of neurons by maintaining a high neuron-to-astrocyte surface coverage ratio. Atomic layer deposition-based surface modification was employed to decouple the effect of morphology from surface chemistry. Additionally, length scale effects were systematically studied by controlling the characteristic feature size of np-Au through variations in the dealloying conditions. Our results show that np-Au nanotopography, not surface chemistry, reduces astrocyte surface coverage while maintaining high neuronal coverage and may enhance neuron-electrode coupling through nanostructure-mediated suppression of scar tissue formation.

KW - Cell-material interaction

KW - Gliosis

KW - Multifunctional biomaterial

KW - Nanoporous gold

KW - Nanostructure

KW - Nanotopography

KW - Neural electrode

KW - Neuron-astrocyte co-culture

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84926673570&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84926673570&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1021/acsami.5b00410

DO - 10.1021/acsami.5b00410

M3 - Article

C2 - 25706691

AN - SCOPUS:84926673570

VL - 7

SP - 7093

EP - 7100

JO - ACS applied materials & interfaces

JF - ACS applied materials & interfaces

SN - 1944-8244

IS - 13

ER -