Nanometer-Scale Sizing Accuracy of Particle Suspensions on an Unmodified Cell Phone Using Elastic Light Scattering

Zachary J. Smith, Kaiqin Chu, Sebastian Wachsmann-Hogiu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report on the construction of a Fourier plane imaging system attached to a cell phone. By illuminating particle suspensions with a collimated beam from an inexpensive diode laser, angularly resolved scattering patterns are imaged by the phone's camera. Analyzing these patterns with Mie theory results in predictions of size distributions of the particles in suspension. Despite using consumer grade electronics, we extracted size distributions of sphere suspensions with better than 20 nm accuracy in determining the mean size. We also show results from milk, yeast, and blood cells. Performing these measurements on a portable device presents opportunities for field-testing of food quality, process monitoring, and medical diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere46030
JournalPLoS One
Volume7
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2012

Fingerprint

Cell Phones
Elastic scattering
light scattering
Light scattering
Suspensions
Light
portable equipment
process monitoring
Semiconductor Lasers
Food Quality
Process monitoring
cells
particle size distribution
blood cells
Particle Size
cameras
Imaging systems
food quality
Yeast
electronics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Nanometer-Scale Sizing Accuracy of Particle Suspensions on an Unmodified Cell Phone Using Elastic Light Scattering. / Smith, Zachary J.; Chu, Kaiqin; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 7, No. 10, e46030, 02.10.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6f76259017d441588f8d459e2e671bb2,
title = "Nanometer-Scale Sizing Accuracy of Particle Suspensions on an Unmodified Cell Phone Using Elastic Light Scattering",
abstract = "We report on the construction of a Fourier plane imaging system attached to a cell phone. By illuminating particle suspensions with a collimated beam from an inexpensive diode laser, angularly resolved scattering patterns are imaged by the phone's camera. Analyzing these patterns with Mie theory results in predictions of size distributions of the particles in suspension. Despite using consumer grade electronics, we extracted size distributions of sphere suspensions with better than 20 nm accuracy in determining the mean size. We also show results from milk, yeast, and blood cells. Performing these measurements on a portable device presents opportunities for field-testing of food quality, process monitoring, and medical diagnosis.",
author = "Smith, {Zachary J.} and Kaiqin Chu and Sebastian Wachsmann-Hogiu",
year = "2012",
month = "10",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0046030",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nanometer-Scale Sizing Accuracy of Particle Suspensions on an Unmodified Cell Phone Using Elastic Light Scattering

AU - Smith, Zachary J.

AU - Chu, Kaiqin

AU - Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

PY - 2012/10/2

Y1 - 2012/10/2

N2 - We report on the construction of a Fourier plane imaging system attached to a cell phone. By illuminating particle suspensions with a collimated beam from an inexpensive diode laser, angularly resolved scattering patterns are imaged by the phone's camera. Analyzing these patterns with Mie theory results in predictions of size distributions of the particles in suspension. Despite using consumer grade electronics, we extracted size distributions of sphere suspensions with better than 20 nm accuracy in determining the mean size. We also show results from milk, yeast, and blood cells. Performing these measurements on a portable device presents opportunities for field-testing of food quality, process monitoring, and medical diagnosis.

AB - We report on the construction of a Fourier plane imaging system attached to a cell phone. By illuminating particle suspensions with a collimated beam from an inexpensive diode laser, angularly resolved scattering patterns are imaged by the phone's camera. Analyzing these patterns with Mie theory results in predictions of size distributions of the particles in suspension. Despite using consumer grade electronics, we extracted size distributions of sphere suspensions with better than 20 nm accuracy in determining the mean size. We also show results from milk, yeast, and blood cells. Performing these measurements on a portable device presents opportunities for field-testing of food quality, process monitoring, and medical diagnosis.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84867018922&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84867018922&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0046030

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0046030

M3 - Article

C2 - 23056228

AN - SCOPUS:84867018922

VL - 7

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 10

M1 - e46030

ER -