Na/H exchange-dependent cell volume and pH regulation and disturbances

Peter M Cala, Steven E. Anderson, Edward J. Cragoe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1. 1. The role of Na/H exchange in cell volume and pH regulation is discussed. In addition the roles of Cl/HCO3 exchange and system buffers are evaluated as they relate to Na/H exchange-dependent changes in cell salt and water content and intracellular pH. 2. 2. Data obtained from studies of Amphiuma red blood cells showed that in addition to previously reported Na/H exchange dependent volume regulation the pathway is also involved in regulating cell pH. 3. 3. These data showed that in contrast to volume activated Na/H exchange, when the pathway is pH activated it does not deactivate as a function of cell volume. 4. 4. Given what appeared to be mutually exclusive volume and pH regulatory functions of the Na/H exchange, we hypothesized that the pathway might play a role in hypoxic cell swelling (cytotoxic edema). 5. 5. In studies performed on perfused rabbit hearts employing 23Na NMR we were able to observe that relative to normoxic controls hypoxic hearts exhibited a five-fold increase in intracellular Na content when the Na-K pump was inhibited by ouabain and/or K-free perfusate. 6. 6. These studies lead us to conclude that hypoxia-induced Na uptake is the result of an increased inward Na leak as opposed to decreased Na pumping. 7. 7. Based upon studies with a variety of inhibitors of dissipative Na transport, we conclude that the increased inward Na leak in hypoxic hearts is via Na/H exchange.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)551-555
Number of pages5
JournalComparative Biochemistry and Physiology -- Part A: Physiology
Volume90
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1988

Fingerprint

Cell Size
Cells
Ouabain
Water content
Swelling
Buffers
Blood
Urodela
Salts
Nuclear magnetic resonance
Pumps
Edema
Erythrocytes
Rabbits
Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Na/H exchange-dependent cell volume and pH regulation and disturbances. / Cala, Peter M; Anderson, Steven E.; Cragoe, Edward J.

In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology -- Part A: Physiology, Vol. 90, No. 4, 1988, p. 551-555.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7847a598b4c245d496aa567bcb4ead74,
title = "Na/H exchange-dependent cell volume and pH regulation and disturbances",
abstract = "1. 1. The role of Na/H exchange in cell volume and pH regulation is discussed. In addition the roles of Cl/HCO3 exchange and system buffers are evaluated as they relate to Na/H exchange-dependent changes in cell salt and water content and intracellular pH. 2. 2. Data obtained from studies of Amphiuma red blood cells showed that in addition to previously reported Na/H exchange dependent volume regulation the pathway is also involved in regulating cell pH. 3. 3. These data showed that in contrast to volume activated Na/H exchange, when the pathway is pH activated it does not deactivate as a function of cell volume. 4. 4. Given what appeared to be mutually exclusive volume and pH regulatory functions of the Na/H exchange, we hypothesized that the pathway might play a role in hypoxic cell swelling (cytotoxic edema). 5. 5. In studies performed on perfused rabbit hearts employing 23Na NMR we were able to observe that relative to normoxic controls hypoxic hearts exhibited a five-fold increase in intracellular Na content when the Na-K pump was inhibited by ouabain and/or K-free perfusate. 6. 6. These studies lead us to conclude that hypoxia-induced Na uptake is the result of an increased inward Na leak as opposed to decreased Na pumping. 7. 7. Based upon studies with a variety of inhibitors of dissipative Na transport, we conclude that the increased inward Na leak in hypoxic hearts is via Na/H exchange.",
author = "Cala, {Peter M} and Anderson, {Steven E.} and Cragoe, {Edward J.}",
year = "1988",
doi = "10.1016/0300-9629(88)90666-4",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "90",
pages = "551--555",
journal = "Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - A Physiology",
issn = "1095-6433",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Na/H exchange-dependent cell volume and pH regulation and disturbances

AU - Cala, Peter M

AU - Anderson, Steven E.

AU - Cragoe, Edward J.

PY - 1988

Y1 - 1988

N2 - 1. 1. The role of Na/H exchange in cell volume and pH regulation is discussed. In addition the roles of Cl/HCO3 exchange and system buffers are evaluated as they relate to Na/H exchange-dependent changes in cell salt and water content and intracellular pH. 2. 2. Data obtained from studies of Amphiuma red blood cells showed that in addition to previously reported Na/H exchange dependent volume regulation the pathway is also involved in regulating cell pH. 3. 3. These data showed that in contrast to volume activated Na/H exchange, when the pathway is pH activated it does not deactivate as a function of cell volume. 4. 4. Given what appeared to be mutually exclusive volume and pH regulatory functions of the Na/H exchange, we hypothesized that the pathway might play a role in hypoxic cell swelling (cytotoxic edema). 5. 5. In studies performed on perfused rabbit hearts employing 23Na NMR we were able to observe that relative to normoxic controls hypoxic hearts exhibited a five-fold increase in intracellular Na content when the Na-K pump was inhibited by ouabain and/or K-free perfusate. 6. 6. These studies lead us to conclude that hypoxia-induced Na uptake is the result of an increased inward Na leak as opposed to decreased Na pumping. 7. 7. Based upon studies with a variety of inhibitors of dissipative Na transport, we conclude that the increased inward Na leak in hypoxic hearts is via Na/H exchange.

AB - 1. 1. The role of Na/H exchange in cell volume and pH regulation is discussed. In addition the roles of Cl/HCO3 exchange and system buffers are evaluated as they relate to Na/H exchange-dependent changes in cell salt and water content and intracellular pH. 2. 2. Data obtained from studies of Amphiuma red blood cells showed that in addition to previously reported Na/H exchange dependent volume regulation the pathway is also involved in regulating cell pH. 3. 3. These data showed that in contrast to volume activated Na/H exchange, when the pathway is pH activated it does not deactivate as a function of cell volume. 4. 4. Given what appeared to be mutually exclusive volume and pH regulatory functions of the Na/H exchange, we hypothesized that the pathway might play a role in hypoxic cell swelling (cytotoxic edema). 5. 5. In studies performed on perfused rabbit hearts employing 23Na NMR we were able to observe that relative to normoxic controls hypoxic hearts exhibited a five-fold increase in intracellular Na content when the Na-K pump was inhibited by ouabain and/or K-free perfusate. 6. 6. These studies lead us to conclude that hypoxia-induced Na uptake is the result of an increased inward Na leak as opposed to decreased Na pumping. 7. 7. Based upon studies with a variety of inhibitors of dissipative Na transport, we conclude that the increased inward Na leak in hypoxic hearts is via Na/H exchange.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0023683406&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0023683406&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0300-9629(88)90666-4

DO - 10.1016/0300-9629(88)90666-4

M3 - Article

C2 - 2902960

AN - SCOPUS:0023683406

VL - 90

SP - 551

EP - 555

JO - Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - A Physiology

JF - Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - A Physiology

SN - 1095-6433

IS - 4

ER -