Myelomeningocele: Characterization of a surgically induced sheep model and its central nervous system similarities and differences to the human disease

Cornelia S. Von Koch, Nathalie Compagnone, Shinjiro Hirose, Suzanne Yoder, Michael R. Harrison, Diana L Farmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine how closely the surgically induced sheep myelomeningocele (MMC) model resembles the central nervous system derangements seen in human disease, and identify which aspects of MMC are the result of the early neuronal developmental defect, and which are secondary to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. Study design: An MMC-like lesion was created surgically in 16 fetal sheep at 75 days' gestation: 5 died in utero, 7 underwent no fetal repair, 4 were repaired (2-layer closure or biological glue) at 100 days' gestation. MMC sheep were delivered at term and allowed to survive up to 17 days for analysis of behavioral status and feeding behavior. Animals not repaired in utero were repaired at birth. All lambs were sacrificed and analyzed for hindbrain herniation, hydrocephalus, and other CNS derangements. Results: Hindbrain herniation was observed in 43% of animals not repaired in utero, and in 1 lamb repaired with Bioglue. No animal developed hydrocephalus or other CNS derangements. Conclusion: Although this sheep MMC-like model reproduces the CSF leak, but not the developmental defect seen in humans, it suggests CSF leak contributes to hindbrain herniation seen in humans. This model may be useful to develop new minimally invasive techniques to halt CSF leak in utero.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1456-1462
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume193
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2005

Fingerprint

Meningomyelocele
Sheep
Central Nervous System
Rhombencephalon
Hydrocephalus
Pregnancy
Feeding Behavior
Adhesives
Parturition
Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

Keywords

  • Arnold-Chiari malformation
  • Fetal surgery
  • Hindbrain herniation
  • Myelomeningocele
  • Sheep
  • Spina bifida

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Myelomeningocele : Characterization of a surgically induced sheep model and its central nervous system similarities and differences to the human disease. / Von Koch, Cornelia S.; Compagnone, Nathalie; Hirose, Shinjiro; Yoder, Suzanne; Harrison, Michael R.; Farmer, Diana L.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 193, No. 4, 10.2005, p. 1456-1462.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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