Music, Spirituality, and Caring Science: The Effect of a Cappella Song on Healthcare Staff in Medical–Surgical Units

Anita Catlin, Michael Cobbina, Raymond Dougherty, Denise Laws

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Researchers report improved patient well-being, stress, and pain reduction when musical interventions are used. No studies were found using music as a staff member intervention. Hospital chaplains and nurses tested the use of music to assist staff nurses in embracing Watson's Caritas Qualities. A 3-member choir sang a cappella to medical–surgical nurses. The Visual Analog Scale measured effect of music on intentional centering, calmness, peacefulness, and transpersonal connection. Statistical results showed improvement in nurses' well-being. The use of music on the clinical unit has potential to improve nursing self-care and, thus, patient care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)234-241
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cognitive Psychotherapy
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • chaplain
  • music
  • spiritual care
  • staff nurse
  • Visual Analog Scale
  • Watson theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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